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First POST: WhatsNext?

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, April 10 2014

WhatsNext?

  • Could WhatsApp actually be the "killer app" of the upcoming Indian national elections? Amin Ali and Atul Thakur write for The Times of India that

    "Unlike social networking websites which need internet profiles, WhatsApp operates in relative web oblivion. The application does use the internet but no search engine would be able to detect WhatsApp profiles, groups or chats. Real-time response also makes WhatsApp the most effective social networking tool for political campaigning."

  • Our Jessica McKenzie rounds up "Everything You Need to Know About Social Media and India's General Election." Consider this a preview of what we are likely to see in the US as the 2016 presidential cycle heats up: Google offering a "Google score" for how politicians are trending in Search, YouTube and Google Plus engagement; Facebook Talks Live; and the rising importance of mobile text apps, as noted above.

  • I'm coming to this late, but Andrew Sullivan's second major post on the Brendan Eich controversy at Mozilla is a must-read.

  • Writer and director Greg Allen offers a startling take on "Art of the Bush School," that is, those paintings of world leaders done by former President George W. Bush. Come for the fact, noticed by Allen, that each portrait is based on the top image search result on Google for each of Bush's subjects; stay for the art criticism.

  • Kevin Roose of New York Magazine picks up on the story of a still anonymous woman who used Secret to share her tale of being left out of Google's buy-out of her tech start-up.

  • Speaking at the U.S. Naval Academy, former President Bill Clinton described Edward Snowden as an "imperfect messenger" but one that raised important questions, reports Tal Kopan for Politico. "We cannot change the character of our country or compromise the future of our people by creating a national security state, which takes away the liberty and privacy we propose to advance," Clinton noted.

  • Worried about how to respond to the Heartbleed bug? Read James Fallows.

  • Congress is finally moving towards making information about bills machine-readable, Daniel Schulman celebrates at CREW's blog.

  • The annual M & R eBenchmarks study is out, and not only is this one chock-a-block with interesting data about online fundraising and advocacy trends among non-profits, it's got a beautiful and engaging design.

News Briefs

RSS Feed tuesday >

First POST: Climate Changes

Google ends its support for ALEC; how network-centric organizing powered the big People's Climate march; is it time to retire the term "blogosphere"; and much, much more. GO

monday >

Germany Releases Open Data Action Plan Amidst Grassroots Enthusiasm and Pirate Party Turmoil

The German government on Wednesday unveiled its open data action plan to implement the open data charter established by the G8, now G7, countries. But while German open government advocates welcomed its release, for them it does not go far enough. Even as the open data movement is taking new hold in Germany on the local level with encouragement from the new Code for Germany effort, in the national Pirate Party, the supposed German net party, internal leadership disputes are overshadowing its digital agenda. GO

First POST: Packed

The impact of Sunday's giant People's Climate march in NYC; how the Kapor Center is increasing the role of minorities in tech; why Uber's business model is anti-worker; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Scotched

Why conservatives should back net neutrality; how big data may damage civil rights; the ways Silicon Valley start-ups are exploiting freelance workers; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Resets

Apple's new iOS8 promises greater user privacy; Occupy Wall Street three years later; how tech may tilt the Scotland independence vote; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Connecting the Dots

Take Back the Tech grades Facebook, Twitter, et al, on transparency; MayDay PAC founder Lawrence Lessig talks about getting matched funds; and much, much more. GO

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