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First POST: Dorian Mode

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, March 7 2014

Dorian Mode

  • The man Newsweek identified as the inventor of Bitcoin denies it, reports the AP's Ryan Nakashima.

  • An account belonging to Satoshi Nakamoto on the P2P Foundation site, which had been dormant for 3 years, has posted this message: "I am not Dorian Nakamoto."

  • Redditors aren't happy that Nakamoto (if it is indeed him) was "doxxed," Andrew Beaujon reports for Poynter.

  • Newsweek's editor says they're standing by the story, reports Gawker's J.K. Trotter.

  • PandoDaily attacks Newsweek for "putting a man's life at risk."

  • By the way, if this is your first exposure to the P2P Foundation, definitely check them out. Its founder, Michel Bauwens, is currently advising Ecuador on how to become an "open social knowledge, commons based society."

  • Edward Snowden's testimony to the European Parliament has been posted online by the Netherlands D66 party. It's a very good summary of all that has been revealed by the reporting done since last year, in case you need a catch-up. My favorite Q&A: "Who is currently financing your life?" "I am."

  • Digging into the Snowden files, The Intercept's Peter Maass discovers the agency has an internal advice columnist.

  • Colin Robinson, the co-founder of OR Books, which published Julian Assange's Cypherpunks: Freedom and the Future of the Internet in 2012, writes in The Guardian "In defense of Julian Assange," criticizing Andrew O'Hagan's recent essay on his erstwhile subject. "O'Hagan portrays Assange as a Walter Mitty-like fantasist whose absorption with grand and unrealisable schemes prevents him from ever achieving anything practical," Robinson writes, then noting "I have direct experience of Assange's ability to get things done." (Full disclosure: OR Books is also my publisher.)

  • Confirming what many drone enthusiasts have been arguing for some time, a federal judge has ruled that the FAA's rules prohibiting the commercial use of small drones wasn't enforceable because they hadn't been developed as part of a formal rule-making process.

  • Digital rights lawyer Christina Gagnier is throwing her hat in the ring to replace outgoing CA Rep. Gloria McLeod, reports Gregory Ferenstein of TechCrunch.

  • An employee of the World Intellectual Property Agency is alleging that the agency's director general "illegally collected DNA samples from WIPO staffers in order to out a whistleblower," Cory Doctorow of BoingBoing reports.

  • If the GOP chooses to hold the 2016 Republican National Convention in Las Vegas, the trackers from American Bridge are already planning to keep an eye on them. Many eyes.

  • General Assembly, the three-year-old school for coders, announced it has raised more than $35 million in new funding.

  • Housekeeping note: First POST will be on semi-hiatus next week as I will be traveling, first to Austin to do a virtual interview with Glenn Greenwald at SXSW and then to Warsaw for PDF Poland-CEE.