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First POST: Don't Spill Anything

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, March 6 2014

Don't Spill Anything

  • The CIA's monitoring of Senate staffers computer usage apparently came to light after the agency complained to the Senate Intelligence Committee that aides working on the committee's investigation of its detention and interrogation program had printed out secret documents pertaining to that program and removed them from CIA headquarters. This, reports McClatchy DC's Jonathan Landay, Ali Watkins and Marisa Taylor, led "to a determination that the agency recorded the staffers’ use of the computers in the high-security research room."

  • Asked by McClatchy DC about the apparent CIA monitoring of Intelligence Committee computers, President Obama--who was then eating lunch during a visit to Connecticut with four New England governors--said, "I'm going to try to make sure I don't spill anything on my tie."

  • Dan Froomkin explains in The Intercept why this is a "deep state" issue: does Congress oversee the CIA, or vice versa?

  • Newsweek's Leah McGrath Goodman is pretty sure she's uncovered the inventor of BitCoin, Satoshi Nakamoto, living out in the open in Temple City, CA.

  • Speaking of BitCoin, Rep. Jared Solis wants to ban the use of dollars, noting that they too can be used for fraudulent and untraceable activities.

  • The U.S. Attorney in the Barrett Brown case has moved to dismiss the eleven charges against him that centered on his sharing a link in an online chat room, Andrea Peterson reports in the Washington Post. He still faces charges related to possessing stolen credit card numbers, concealing evidence and threatening an FBI agent.

  • StopFake.org is a week-old crowdsourced journalism project trying to counter false information about events in Ukraine.

  • The Institute for Local Self-Reliance has released a new study showing how Santa Monica, Ca built its own fiber-optic network, taking an incremental approach without incurring any debt.

  • Interactive features like Slate's "Adele Dazeem Generator" drive traffic to news sites, and the New York Times' Leslie Kaufman is ON IT.

  • British PM David Cameron tweeted a picture of himself talking on the phone to President Barack Obama about Ukraine, and then Twitter got a hold of it. Start here, then go here.

News Briefs

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