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First POST: Tools

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, February 28 2014

Tools

  • The new installment of the Knight News Challenge is focused on strengthening the free and open Internet. $2.75 million will go to those with a good enough idea--the deadline for the first round of applications is March 18.

  • David Meyer reports for Gigaom on the rise of consumer-friendly privacy tools like Mailpile.

  • Trevor Timm of the Freedom of the Press Foundation explains why they're backing open source encryption tools. (Maybe Knight can send them a check?)

  • WTF? The Houston City Attorney has issued a cease and desist order against Uber, demanding that it stop "transmitting or aiding in the transmission of form e-mails to City officials." He adds, "the excessive number of e-mails has gone unabated, to the point that it has become harassing in nature and arguably unlawful." Needless to say, Uber isn't backing down. An editorial in the Houston Chronicle adds context and support.

  • Valleywag's Nitasha Tiku reports on how an enterprising freelance engineer took advantage of Google Maps' loose verification system to post fake numbers for the FBI and Secret Service, and then recorded real service calls to those agencies. He says he acted after repeated efforts to get Google to fix those flaws were ignored.

  • A group protesting the Citizens United ruling managed to secretly videotape their protest from inside the Supreme Court, where cameras are strictly not allowed, Adam Liptak of the New York Times reports.

  • A homeless person helping explain the value of a startup called HandUp moves an audience of techies to tears at the Launch conference.

  • In the movie "Her," the main character played by Joaquin Phoenix, works at a fictional company that writes personalized letters on behalf of busy people, sometimes even writing both sides of an ongoing relationship. In Wired, Evan Selinger profiles BroApp, a "clever relationship wingman" tool that sends "automated daily text messages" and promises "seamless relationship outsourcing." Selinger notes the app might be a parody, but it's awfully close to where things are going, he argues.

  • Fresh: Our Miranda Neubauer reportson the challenge of getting New York City's community boards to modernize their use of tech, and the ongoing work of local Code for America brigade BetaNYC.

  • Alec Ross reflects on Ukraine's future for CNN.com, noting that it is the top outsourcing destination in the region for information-technology services, but mourning that corruption and authoritarianism are stymying the country's nascent civic tech sector.

  • Leading Russian democracy activist and anti-corruption blogger Alexei Navalny has been placed under house arrest for two months and forbidden from using the Internet or talking to the media.

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: Outings

"Snowdenites" may have the "upper hand" in surveillance politics; ten lessons from the "underdog" net neutrality win; "Europtechnopanic"; ISIS threatens Twitter founder; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Revisions

Tim Wu says we shouldn't be so pessimistic about lobbying; Obama writes a thank you note to reddit; Ted Cruz wants to be the Uber of politics; Llamas!; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Impossibles

The FCC vote; a proxy Democratic primary battle in Chicago; Gov Andrew Cuomo begins deleting all state employee emails more than 90 days old; men talking about women in tech; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Off the Books

Chicago's "black site"; The New York Times reports "little guys" like Tumblr and Reddit have won the fight for net neutrality but fails to mention Free Press or Demand Progress; Hillary Clinton fan products on Etsy to inspire campaign slogans?; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Challenges

How Silicon Valley donors are thinking about Hillary Clinton 2016; Yahoo's security chief locks horns with the head of the NSA; Instagram location data catches a Congressman with his hand in the till; and much, much more. GO

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