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The Day After The Day We Fought Back: Another Anti-Surveillance Campaign Already in the Works

BY Jessica McKenzie | Wednesday, February 12 2014

Reset button (Greg McMullin/Flickr)

Yesterday was the day the Internet fought back against mass surveillance. According to The Day We Fight Back website, roughly 86,815 calls were made to legislators and 179,682 emails were sent. The question is—what to do now? Luckily, the nonprofit organization Fight for the Future already has something in mind. They are in the process of recruiting participants and building support for the campaign Reset the Net, which will likely take place this spring.

Evan Greer, a campaign manager with Fight for the Future, told techPresident that it will be “the next wave of movement after The Day We Fight Back.”

Like other online protests, Reset the Net will have a banner that participating websites can add to their homepages which will drive traffic to the campaign homepage. In addition to encouraging people to take action by contacting their representatives, Reset the Net also hopes to educate people about security measures they can take to protect their privacy.

A big component of Reset the Net will be educating individuals and companies about privacy tools. It will encourage participating sites and companies to beef up their privacy measures, even something as simple as switching to Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) if they have not already done so.

Ideally it will also give companies that build privacy tools an incentive to put new things out and to promote existing resources.

We envision a “moment when brilliant people are thinking about what the best technology is to protect us,” said Greer, “[that] gives them an incentive to put stuff out and to work with us.”

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