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A New Online Petition Asks the White House to Ban Google Glass

BY Miranda Neubauer | Tuesday, May 7 2013

A new We the People petition is calling on the White House to ban "Google Glass from use in the USA until clear limitations are placed to prevent indecent public surveillance," although so far it only has 17 signatures.

"Google Glass is a new twist on technology which hasn't had clearly stated limits on the locations in US communities where it can and cannot be used," the petition creator from Seattle writes. "In order to protect our communities we need limitations to prevent indecent public surveillance of our friends, children, and families. It is hard to prevent it because the hardware gives no notification that it is recording an individual at any given time."

For the petition to get a White House response, it needs to get 100,000 signatures by June 2.

Commenting on the petition Monday morning, Techdirt's Mike Masnick attributed it to "moral panic" and suggested the White House wouldn't have any authority to ban the device and implement limitations on surveillance. The sensible thing to do would be to wait until the impact of the new technology is clear rather than to ban it preemptively.

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