Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

The Tech Arms Race Is On: Democratic National Committee Is Also Hiring

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Friday, March 15 2013

The Republicans aren't the only ones looking for tech talent. The Democrats are too.

The Democratic National Committee is hiring a new tech team, to be directed by the DNC's Technology Director Bryan Whitaker. An e-mail sent out to Democrats says that the DNC is looking for a software engineer, an analytics engineer, and a front-end developer. The DNC's Web site says that the committee is also looking for a digital content manager.

"We run one of the most innovative political operations the world has ever seen, and we're going to build on that work over the coming months and years," Whitaker writes in his e-mail note. "In order to do that, we're going to need to add a few talented people -- and not just people with experience working in politics."

The Web listings for the digital content manager and analytics engineer ask for the expected applicable skills, but whoever applies for the software engineer position shouldn't be an egomaniac.

"You have no ego about your work -- you take pride in outcomes, but aren't defensive about your code," says the help wanted ad. Also: "You disdain meetings for meetings' sake -- catching up on IRC is much preferred."

The DNC recently renewed its contract with the party's voter file management vendor NGP VAN: They're obviously not sitting around on their hands waiting for the Republicans to catch up.

News Briefs

RSS Feed tuesday >

First POST: Company

The global "Snowden effect" is huge; how many consumer-facing online services fail the user privacy test; the Dems' 2016 digital to-do list; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Mood Slime

The Sony email leak reveals the MPAA's campaign against Google; how Uber is lobbying in local markets; mapping the #MillionsMarchNYC; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Cloudy

What the Internet is not; new analysis of public opinion on net neutrality; how cloud backup apparently foiled a police coverup; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Records

Is the future of citizen journalism vigilantism?; one tech mogul's vocal support for CIA torture; a cri de couer from the founder of the Pirate Bay; and much, much more. GO

Web Index Sees Impact of Net Neutrality, Surveillance and Copyright Laws

Denmark, Finland, Norway, the United Kingdom and Sweden have come out on top of the Web Index, a ranking of the Web Foundation measuring the economic, social and political benefit that countries gain from the web. The United States is at number six. For the authors of the report accompanying the index, the results reflect how inequality has an impact on access to the web. "Nordic policy-makers have been quick to adopt and promote the free Internet - and open access to information - as a 21st century public good," the report states. " Others, as this year's findings show, need to move fast to catch up." The report attributes the Scandinavian countries' advantage to the countries' broader efforts to invest in public goods and establish a welfare and acting against " excess concentrations of wealth and power." With the lower inequality in those countries than in others, "the skills, means and freedoms to benefit from new technologies are widespread, which helps to explain why Scandinavian countries score highly on the political, social and economic impact of the Web GO

More