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First POST: Top-Down Movements

BY Nick Judd | Friday, February 22 2013

Behind closed doors, a solution on transparency

  • Obama sent a decisive message on his commitment to transparency, Politico reported today.

    Following outcry from the White House Correspondents Association about a lack of access to the president during his recent vacation, and after an extensive cri-de-coeur from Politico itself about President Barack Obama's low-touch media strategy, the president swiftly responded to his critics.

    He held a private meeting with reporters from major print and television outlets — off the record.

    The web publication's pouty kicker: "POLITICO was not invited to the meeting, though it has been invited to similar off-the-record meetings in the past."

  • The Project on Government Oversight comments, in a post on the administration's sluggish response to Freedom of Information Act requests:

    The federal government has a FOIA problem: there is far too much secrecy. Many agencies have failed to fulfill the Obama Administration’s mandate to adopt a “presumption of openness.” There has been no grand shift toward a culture of releasing information proactively—before a FOIA request is made. The system remains broken, and backlogs continue to grow.

"Leaning" on Sheryl Sandberg

  • The New York Times offers a critical look at Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg's plan to create a "social movement" around women in the workplace:

    “I always thought I would run a social movement,” Ms. Sandberg, 43, said in an interview for “Makers,” a new documentary on feminist history.

    And yet no one knows whether women will show up for Ms. Sandberg’s revolution, a top-down affair propelled by a fortune worth hundreds of millions on paper, or whether the social media executive can form a women’s network of her own. Only a single test “Lean In Circle” exists. With less than three weeks until launch — which will include a spread in Time magazine and splashy events like a book party at Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s home — organizers cannot say how many more groups may sprout up.

What's next for Obama's technology experts?

  • Startups, vacations, and, for some, more time in public service:

    With the campaign behind them, Obama for America Technology alumni are scattered across the country — some still in Chicago, some making a new start in a new city, others still taking time off for travel. In interviews, some of these coders, designers, and product managers said that the campaign was a political break in a career otherwise spent in the tech sector. Others told me their time working for Obama has convinced them to focus on civic life. All of them expressed a connection to their campaign colleagues and to OfA's test-everything, data-driven organizing ethos that, they say, is likely to inform everything they do next.

Around the web

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: Scary Monsters

Facebook opens up about its experiments on tweaking voting behavior; breaking news in the FCC net neutrality battle; getting hard data on civic tech's impact on political efficacy; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: System-Gaming

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wednesday >

First POST: Gimme Shelter

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tuesday >

First POST: Tribes

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monday >

First POST: Inventions

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friday >

First POST: Spoilers

How the GOP hasn't fixed its tech talent gap; the most tech-savvy elected official in America, and the most tech-savvy state-wide candidate; and much, much more. GO

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