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First POST: The Ephemeral Web

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, February 7 2013

Data distrust

  • A firm that sells information about voters collected by Democrats is backing off plans to look for clients in the private sector.

Hoping to get the word out

  • Organizers hope a mix of training and technology will create a communications network to chronicle irregularities, counter rumors, and hopefully stave off violence surrounding upcoming elections in Kenya.

Militarizing the Internet

"Start with the one, and see how it goes from there"

  • When will it end? Evgeny Morozov keeps on trying to paint "Future Perfect" author Steven B. Johnson as an "Internet centrist," someone who believes that the Internet holds the solution to every problem. Johnson's book, which we discussed at New York Law School when it came out, makes the case that networks of people — probably using the Internet — can find the solution to a lot of problems. The pair went back and forth in The (new) New Republic, and on their personal blogs, and the argument seems to have grown from a singleton into a full-blown course of ten.

Around the web

News Briefs

RSS Feed wednesday >

New Media Sites in Iran Blur Lines Between Citizen Journo, Professional Journo, & Activist

In 2010, Newsweek declared Iran the “birthplace of citizen journalism.” Iranian bloggers were hailed by Westerners as “brave” for their coverage of the aftermath of the disputed 2009 election. A 40-second video of the death of Neda Agha-Soltan during an anti-government protest won a prestigious George Polk Award, the first anonymously-produced work to be so honored. And then came the 2013 study “Whither Blogestan,” which sought to explain Iran's shrinking blogosphere. Of nearly 25,000 highly active and connected blogs in 2008 and 2009, only 20 percent were still online in September 2013.

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