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First POST: The Ephemeral Web

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, February 7 2013

Data distrust

  • A firm that sells information about voters collected by Democrats is backing off plans to look for clients in the private sector.

Hoping to get the word out

  • Organizers hope a mix of training and technology will create a communications network to chronicle irregularities, counter rumors, and hopefully stave off violence surrounding upcoming elections in Kenya.

Militarizing the Internet

"Start with the one, and see how it goes from there"

  • When will it end? Evgeny Morozov keeps on trying to paint "Future Perfect" author Steven B. Johnson as an "Internet centrist," someone who believes that the Internet holds the solution to every problem. Johnson's book, which we discussed at New York Law School when it came out, makes the case that networks of people — probably using the Internet — can find the solution to a lot of problems. The pair went back and forth in The (new) New Republic, and on their personal blogs, and the argument seems to have grown from a singleton into a full-blown course of ten.

Around the web

News Briefs

RSS Feed thursday >

NYC Open Data Advocates Focus on Quality And Value Over Quantity

The New York City Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications plans to publish more than double the amount of datasets this year than it published to the portal last year, new Commissioner Anne Roest wrote last week in an annual report mandated by the city's open data law, with 135 datasets scheduled to be released this year, and almost 100 more to come in 2015. But as preparations are underway for City Council open data oversight hearings in the fall, what matters more to advocates than the absolute number of the datasets is their quality. GO

Civic Tech and Engagement: Announcing a New Series on What Makes it "Thick"

Announcing a new series of feature articles that we will be publishing over the next several months, thanks to the support of the Rita Allen Foundation. Our focus is on digitally-enabled civic engagement, and in particular, how and under what conditions "thick" digital civic engagement occurs. What we're after is answers to this question: When does a tech tool or platform enable actual people to make ongoing and significant contributions to each other, to a place or cause, at a scale that produces demonstrable change? GO

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