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Netanyahu Chooses Actor Who Satirizes Him as Doppelganger in Facebook Meme

BY Lisa Goldman | Monday, February 4 2013

Wondering why so many of the people on your Facebook timeline have replaced their profile photos with the image of a celebrity? Wonder no more: It's International Doppelganger Week. The popular social media meme is predicated on the idea that everyone has been told at least once that he or she resembles a celebrity, so let's celebrate our resemblance for a few days on Facebook.

International Doppelganger Week has taken place during the first week of February since 2010. Two platforms help meme participants find the celebrity they most resemble — MyHeritage.com, which is currently over capacity, and Doppelgangerweek.com.

The Huffington Post claims to have interviewed the creator of the meme, identified as an IT worker named Bob Patel, who says he came up with the idea after being told he resembles Tom Selleck. But Time Magazine disputes the Huff Po's story, calling it "dubious" and implying that the alleged interview was meant to be read as satire.

Disputed creators aside, Doppelganger Week has undeniably become one of Facebook's more popular memes, with the event page showing nearly 26,000 "likes" as of this writing.

Now even the prime minister of Israel is participating in the meme. On his official Facebook page, Benjamin "Bibi" Netanyahu substituted the photo of a comedian who portrays him in Eretz Nehederet ("It's a Wonderful Country"), a popular political satire show. Mariano Idelman, who has acted in several well-known Israeli television shows, plays Netanyahu as a bumbling buffoon who speaks with a pedantic, self-satisfied manner.


In this (awkwardly subtitled) clip from Eretz Nehederet, Mariano Idelman plays Netanyahu in a tense meeting with President Obama.

More than 12,000 people "liked" the prime minister's choice of a doppelganger.

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