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A TechPresident Podcast: Political Innovation vs. the Greater Good

BY Nick Judd | Friday, February 1 2013

In this week's techPresident Podcast:

MICAH SIFRY: "This kind of microtargeting and data analytics and so on may well work to enhance some people's power, but it does not necessarily produce a situation where more people participate, more people have voice. I think this is a little provocative, especially to some folks on the Obama side who feel that they're doing God's work as progressives ...

We are still wrestling with the question of whether all this sophisticated use of science and data and analytics is really going to make the process better for everyone. And we didn't settle it."

After the campaigns, many staffers are deciding what to do next. Some are headed into the civic space, where they'll apply lessons they learned on the campaigns in a nonpartisan way.

Can so-called "big data," or data-driven persuasion, improve politics for everyone? Or is it just the province of a wealthy few? Join the conversation with your comments.

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