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The RIAA Wants Members of the House to Share Music Over Spotify, A File-Sharing Network

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Thursday, January 31 2013

The Recording Industry Association of America on Thursday implored the chief administrative officer of the U.S. House to allow its members to stream and share music using Spotify, a legal music sharing service that's the direct descendant of Napster.

"Spotify is a licensed, secure online music streaming service. In fact, it is one of the dozens of authorized digital services that the music community is partnering with to offer a catalogue of millions of songs to fans, however they want it, whenever they want it – including members of Congress and their aides," wrote Cary Sherman, the RIAA's chairman and CEO, to the House' Chief Administrative Officer Daniel J. Strodel in a Wednesday letter. "We appreciate your need to ensure that the House network is secure, and we would welcome the opportunity to work with you to develop a new policy that ensures that users of the House network will be able to gain access to these new legal services."

Sherman sent the letter off after reading a report in POLITICO about the ban. Those who have been following congressional debates over filesharing over the years will appreciate the irony: For years members of Congress have equated file-sharing services as cesspits of evil, declaring them the prime networks of exchange for child pornography. Now they're begging their network administrators for access to services like Skype and Spotify.

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