Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

The RIAA Wants Members of the House to Share Music Over Spotify, A File-Sharing Network

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Thursday, January 31 2013

The Recording Industry Association of America on Thursday implored the chief administrative officer of the U.S. House to allow its members to stream and share music using Spotify, a legal music sharing service that's the direct descendant of Napster.

"Spotify is a licensed, secure online music streaming service. In fact, it is one of the dozens of authorized digital services that the music community is partnering with to offer a catalogue of millions of songs to fans, however they want it, whenever they want it – including members of Congress and their aides," wrote Cary Sherman, the RIAA's chairman and CEO, to the House' Chief Administrative Officer Daniel J. Strodel in a Wednesday letter. "We appreciate your need to ensure that the House network is secure, and we would welcome the opportunity to work with you to develop a new policy that ensures that users of the House network will be able to gain access to these new legal services."

Sherman sent the letter off after reading a report in POLITICO about the ban. Those who have been following congressional debates over filesharing over the years will appreciate the irony: For years members of Congress have equated file-sharing services as cesspits of evil, declaring them the prime networks of exchange for child pornography. Now they're begging their network administrators for access to services like Skype and Spotify.

News Briefs

RSS Feed friday >

First POST: Overreaching

Why the FCC balked at the Comcast-TimeWarner deal; Sheryl Sandberg wants Hillary Clinton to lean into the White House; the UK's Democracy Club brings a lot more information to election season; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Ownership

"Tell us more about your bog"; the shrinking role of public participation on campaign websites; "Aaron's Law" has been reintroduced in Congress; is the Comcast-TimeWarner merger on its last legs?; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Bush League

Presidential candidates hiding behind Super PACs; what this means for American democracy; demos at the White House; a demand for Facebook to be more open about news in the newsfeed; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Glass Half Full

A new Pew study on open government data in the US; the FOIA exemption ruffling transparency advocates' feathers; social media bot farms; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Zucked Up

Mark Zuckerberg responds to criticism of "zero rating" Facebook access in India; turning TVs into computers; how Facebook is changing the way UK users see the upcoming General Election; BuzzFeed's split priorities; a new website for "right-of-center women"; and much, much more. GO

More