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First POST: Fixing Elections

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, January 31 2013

Fix the vote

  • Following President Barack Obama's inaugural mention of electoral administration, House Democrats have introduced H.R. 12, the Voter Empowerment Act of 2013. Among other things, the bill would require states to provide online voter registration, clarifies voter ID requirements, sets standards for privacy — including a provision that victims of domestic violence, for example, might have their information retained by the state but withheld from view — and lays out guidelines to improve accuracy of the voter rolls.

    The bill has been referred to several House committees.

Chinese hackers get behind the paywall

  • The New York Times reports that people in China attempted to access its reporters' email addresses and gain other information from its computer networks:

    The timing of the attacks coincided with the reporting for a Times investigation, published online on Oct. 25, that found that the relatives of Wen Jiabao, China’s prime minister, had accumulated a fortune worth several billion dollars through business dealings.

Building towards reform?

  • Google and Twitter transparency reports released earlier this week expand a conversation about online privacy in a way that what's available from the government simply won't do, Miranda Neubauer writes:

    "The government is so secretive that the only way we can get this information is through the companies," [the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Trevor] Timm told techPresident.

    As a result, only companies like Google and Facebook are providing the kinds of information that watchdogs and members of Congress need when considering how to reform the Electronic Communications Privacy Act — a law consistently invoked when defining online privacy despite the fact that it is 27 years old and predates the modern Internet.

    Companies like Facebook or cellphone carriers should release similar information, he said.

No honor among pirates?

Around the web

  • One of our favorite things at techPresident is the "Personal Explanations" tumblr, which documents when members of Congress ask that a change of their vote be noted in the Congressional Record as well as the sometimes absurd excuses given by members who miss a vote. Today Personal Explanations catches Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) in action:

    As some Supreme Court Justice said sometime, sunlight keeps
    mold from happening, or something to that effect.

  • Nextgov's Joseph Marks writes: "Every federal agency’s information technology shop should include workers with expertise in social media, open government and cloud computing. That's according to new guidance from the federal Chief Information Officers Council."

  • And also looks at how Congress might get closer to a GitHub-ready version of the U.S. Code.

  • Look at this software suite for municipal councils to better manage legislation.

  • In Minnesota, a business-to-business online exchange to help distribute flu vaccines.

  • Mobile phones are proliferating in Africa, but when it comes to coverage, reception is still very spotty in rural areas, Reuters reports.

  • The British-made Raspberry Pi, a credit-card-sized, bare-bones computer available for $35, will be headed to UK schools to help kids learn programming and computer science thanks to support from Google. While your First POST editor uses a Raspberry Pi as a front end for his home media center, the tiny computer was always intended to be a cheap and easy starter kit for kids to learn computing from the ground up — to understand what technology is and what it can do, rather than only what a vendor allows it to do, and to think like a maker rather than a consumer.

News Briefs

RSS Feed wednesday >

First POST: Outgassing

How Beijing is throttling expressions of solidarity with the Hong Kong democracy protests; is the DCCC going overboard with its online fundraising tactics?; SumOfUs's innovative new engagement metric; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

With Vision of Internet Magna Carta, Web We Want Campaign Aims To Go Beyond Protest Mode

On Saturday, Tim Berners-Lee reiterated his call for an Internet Magna Carta to ensure the independence and openness of the World Wide Web and protection of user privacy. His remarks were part of the opening of the Web We Want Festival at the Southbank Centre in London, which the Web We Want campaign envisioned as only the start of a year long international process underlying his call to formulate concrete visions for the open web of the future, going beyond protests and the usual advocacy groups. GO

First POST: Lifestyles

Google's CEO on "work-life balance"; how CloudFlare just doubled the size of the encrypted web; Dems like Twitter; Reps like Pinterest; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Showdown

How demonstrators in Hong Kong are using mobile tech to route around government control; will the news penetrate mainland China?; dueling spin from Dems and Reps on which party's tech efforts will matter more in November; and much, much more. GO

friday >

Pirate MEP Crowdsources Internet Policy Questions For Designated EU Commissioners

While the Pirate Party within Germany was facing internal disputes over the last week, the German Pirate Party member in the European Parliament, Julia Reda, is seeking to make the European Commission appointment process more transparent by crowdsourcing questions for the designated Commissioner for Digital Economy & Society and the designated Vice President for the Digital Single Market. GO

First POST: Dogfood

What ethical social networking might look like; can the iPhone promise more privacy?; how Obama did on transparency; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Sucks

How the FCC can't communicate; tech is getting more political; Facebook might see a lawsuit for its mood manipulation experiment; and much, much more. GO

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