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Looking For Organizingforaction.com? Sorry, Domain's Taken

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Monday, January 28 2013

Obama supporters have developed a reputation for being tech savvy, but they may have dropped the ball on this one. Organizing for Action, the advocacy group founded to enable Obama 2012 campaign supporters to lobby lawmakers and the public on issues of importance to them, has failed to register its own domain name.

The result is that Organizingforaction.net, Organizingforaction.com and Organizingforaction.org have all been registered to some enterprising individuals who snapped up the domains on January 18, the day the news broke about the new group. The people listed as the contacts didn't respond to e-mails asking them what they intend to do with domains.

Organizing for Action's Executive Director Jon Carson could register Organizing for Action as a trademark and then dispute the ownership of those domains to the World Intellectual Property Organization in Geneva. WIPO says that most disputes take two months to resolve.

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