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PODCAST: What Makes an Internet-Ready Issue?

BY Nick Judd | Friday, January 18 2013

Today, open Internet advocates are celebrating "Internet Freedom Day," the anniversary of widespread online protest against the controversial Stop Online Piracy Act and Protect IP Act that rattled Congress enough to kill both bills.

One year later, what does the nascent politically active web mean for members of Congress? For activists? And for individuals?

In the first of what we hope to turn into a regular series of podcasts, editorial director Micah Sifry and I hash through how we think about these issues at techPresident. The full conversation is available for subscribers, but here's a quick overview of what we discussed:

We're also opening up a question not just to subscribers, but to everyone.

It's clear some issues, like an "existential threat" to the open Internet or bills that would limit access to health care for women, travel better online than others. But this is far more art than science.

So join the conversation on our Facebook page or on Twitter with the hashtag #pdchat: What is it that makes a cause or an issue that travels well on the Internet, that picks up the kind of steam that SOPA/PIPA or even "binders full of women" accumulated in a short amount of time?

TechPresident's editors and writers will be chiming in on this throughout the week, and hopefully we'll be able to revisit the answers in our next podcast.

News Briefs

RSS Feed thursday >

First POST: Creeping

Senator Al Franken's tough questions for Uber's CEO; how the NSA could make its phone metadata program permanent; global privacy groups launch a personal spyware catcher called Detekt; and much, much more. GO

Recreation.gov and other Govt Projects Move Toward Embracing New Digital Approach

A draft request for proposals for the revamping of Recreation.gov will include a requirement that reservation availability data be publicly accessible and that all proposals detail how they will enable third-party sales, as two members of the United States Digital Services have joined the government team overseeing the RFP, meeting some key demands of civic technologists and consumer oriented technology companies. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Ubermenschens

Surge-pricing in effect for Uber privacy violations; why "privacy" policies should be called "data usage" policies; pols silent on Uber mess; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Uber Falles

Uber exposed for plan to dig up dirt on journalist critics; sneaking a SOPA provision into the USA Freedom Act; high-speed free WiFi coming to NYC; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Differences

How to use Twitter to circumvent campaign coordination rules; the net neutrality debate keeps getting hotter; charting the gender balance at dataviz conference using dataviz; and much, much more. GO

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