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First POST: Concealed Carry

BY Miranda Neubauer | Tuesday, January 15 2013

Have gun? Word won't travel

  • Gun control legislation set to pass in New York state "would allow gun permit license holders to petition to not include their names on a public list if they believe the exposure is a danger, according to a legislative source briefed on the draft bill," YNN reported. "A statewide database of pistol permits from counties would not be subject to the Freedom of Information Law."

    The New York Times' Bill Keller notes how ill-equipped our current understanding of privacy is when it is under attack from all sides: Public information becoming more functionally "public" as well as the increasingly encroaching eyes of a government that has eroded the beachhead of judicial review when it comes to monitoring electronic communications:

    When it comes to privacy, we are all hypocrites. We howl when a newspaper publishes public records about personal behavior. At the same time, we are acquiescing in a much more sweeping erosion of our privacy — government surveillance, corporate data-mining, political microtargeting, hacker invasions — with no comparable outpouring of protest. As a society we have no coherent view of what information is worth defending and how to defend it.

Around the web

International

  • An Iranian satellite channel broadcasting illegally into the country from Dubai appears to have been blacked out without explanation, and its website is also down.

  • The Economist suggests that Google is being hypocritical for putting pressure on North Korea while holding back in China, and also looked at how the controversy over a a Chinese newspaper played out online.

  • A U.S. supported disaster monitoring and response system for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations was recently completed: "The system provides streams of data on hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, typhoons, forest fires, and other natural disasters from all over ASEAN, combining them into one interface for disaster monitoring and decision making. AHA Centre operators can immediately see the big picture, which improves response times and leads to more efficient use of relief resources," a press release from the U.S. mission notes.

  • A Swedish authority is seeking to make online defamation punishable by law.

  • A British court sentenced two hackers to 100 hours of community service for stealing unreleased music from Sony's servers.

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: Outgassing

How Beijing is throttling expressions of solidarity with the Hong Kong democracy protests; is the DCCC going overboard with its online fundraising tactics?; SumOfUs's innovative new engagement metric; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

With Vision of Internet Magna Carta, Web We Want Campaign Aims To Go Beyond Protest Mode

On Saturday, Tim Berners-Lee reiterated his call for an Internet Magna Carta to ensure the independence and openness of the World Wide Web and protection of user privacy. His remarks were part of the opening of the Web We Want Festival at the Southbank Centre in London, which the Web We Want campaign envisioned as only the start of a year long international process underlying his call to formulate concrete visions for the open web of the future, going beyond protests and the usual advocacy groups. GO

First POST: Lifestyles

Google's CEO on "work-life balance"; how CloudFlare just doubled the size of the encrypted web; Dems like Twitter; Reps like Pinterest; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Showdown

How demonstrators in Hong Kong are using mobile tech to route around government control; will the news penetrate mainland China?; dueling spin from Dems and Reps on which party's tech efforts will matter more in November; and much, much more. GO

friday >

Pirate MEP Crowdsources Internet Policy Questions For Designated EU Commissioners

While the Pirate Party within Germany was facing internal disputes over the last week, the German Pirate Party member in the European Parliament, Julia Reda, is seeking to make the European Commission appointment process more transparent by crowdsourcing questions for the designated Commissioner for Digital Economy & Society and the designated Vice President for the Digital Single Market. GO

First POST: Dogfood

What ethical social networking might look like; can the iPhone promise more privacy?; how Obama did on transparency; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Sucks

How the FCC can't communicate; tech is getting more political; Facebook might see a lawsuit for its mood manipulation experiment; and much, much more. GO

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