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First POST: Grandma Knows How You Voted

BY Miranda Neubauer | Friday, January 11 2013

Friday must-reads

  • Personal Democracy Plus exclusive: The New Organizing Institute's new executive director, Obama for America alumni Ethan Roeder, tells Sarah Lai Stirland that the Democratic Party still doesn't have enough data-driven campaigners. That's where NOI comes in — an organization with an increasing number of connections throughout the party on a mission to train a new generation of candidates and campaign operatives.

  • ICYMI: For ProPublica, Lois Beckett explores the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party's sophisticated, grandma-driven data operation. Grandma-driven, yes, that's right:

    Much of the data the Grandma Brigade collects is prosaic: records of campaign donations or voters who have recently died. But a few volunteers see free information everywhere. They browse the listings of names on Tea Party websites. They might add a record of what was said around the family Thanksgiving table — Uncle Mitch voted for Bachmann, cousin Alice supports gay marriage.

    One data volunteer even joked about holding "rat out your neighbor parties," where friends would be encouraged to add notes about the political views of other people on their block.

  • Iowa Democrat Brad Anderson, who ran the Obama campaign's 2012 Iowa effort, has announced plans to run for secretary of state. Criticizing voter ID proposals pushed for by the current Republican incumbent, Anderson said an electronic verification system to check in voters made more sense, the Des Moines Register reported. He praised The Precinct Atlas Program developed by Republican Ken Kline, the auditor in auditor in Cerro Gordo County. "It’s essentially a digital poll book that replaces the binders of papers. The database flags convicted felons, people who have already requested a ballot by absentee, and those who are at the wrong precinct. And it doesn’t disenfranchise a single voter," he said.

  • Software engineer Luigi Montanez writes about the rise of the activist engineer:

    The prospects for more activist engineers are bolstered by a failed promise of Silicon Valley. A long-time refrain has been that VC-backed Silicon Valley startups can indeed change the world. But the current crop of consumer web and mobile startups don’t live up to that ideal. SnapChat and Facebook Poke aren’t changing the world, they’re enabling people to be even more self-centered and insular. Airbnb and Uber, two terrific services that are profoundly disrupting their markets, don’t make that dent in the universe Steve Jobs once spoke of.

  • In officially nominating Jack Lew as treasury secretary, Obama said, "I had never noticed Jack’s signature. When this was highlighted yesterday in the press I considered rescinding my offer to appoint him. Jack assures me that he will work to make at least one letter legible in order not to debase our currency should he be confirmed as Secretary of the Treasury." Yahoo News offered a Jack Lew Signature Generator. The NYC Public Schools Twitter feed posted yesterday, "Congrats to Jack Lew (Forest Hills HS '72) on his nomination as Secretary of the Treasury. We're proud of all of our students' penmanship!"

Around the web

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: Resets

Apple's new iOS8 promises greater user privacy; Occupy Wall Street three years later; how tech may tilt the Scotland independence vote; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Connecting the Dots

Take Back the Tech grades Facebook, Twitter, et al, on transparency; MayDay PAC founder Lawrence Lessig talks about getting matched funds; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Splits

USA Freedom Act divides Internet activists; Julian Assange's Reddit "Ask Me Anything"; New York's pro-net-neutrality protest; and much, much more GO

monday >

After Election Loss, Teachout and Wu Keep Up Net Neutrality and Anti-Comcast Merger Campaign

The Teachout/Wu campaign may have lost, but their pro net-neutrality campaign continued Monday as both former candidates participated in a rallly in New York City marking the final day to comment on the Federal Communications Commission's Internet proposals and kept up their pressure on Governor Andrew Cuomo. GO

friday >

NYC Politicians and Advocacy Groups Say Airbnb Misrepresents Sharing Economy

A coalition of New York election officials and affordable housing groups have launched an advocacy effort targeting Airbnb called "Share Better" that includes an ad campaign, a web platform, and social media outreach. GO

First POST: Data Dumps

The Internet Slowdown's impact on the FCC; Uber drivers try to go on strike; four kinds of civic tech; and much, much more. GO

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