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Thousands Across Web Pledge Moment of Silence To Honor Sandy Hook Elementary Victims

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Thursday, December 20 2012

Causes.com, and some of the crew who put together the anti-SOPA/PIPA protests early this year, have organized an online 'moment of silence' Friday morning to honor the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary school shooting in Newtown, Mass., and to focus attention to a national call for federal lawmakers to enact new rules to curb gun violence.

More than 100,000 individuals and groups have pledged through Causes to take a few moments Friday at 9.30 a.m. to remember the victims of the shooting, who would have been killed exactly a week ago. The operators of more than 200 Web sites are going to publicize the campaign by "going silent," at that time, and having a "National Moment of Silence" graphic pop up on their sites. The graphic features a link that takes Web surfers to a Causes page that tells them what else they can do to take action.

The project is just one of many that are under contemplation in the tech community as they mobilize to push federal action on gun control.

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The Philippines, a country of almost 100 million, is considered among the most corrupt country in Southeast Asia, despite a boost in Transparency International's Corruption Perception Index in the past few years (from 134th in 2010 to 94th in 2013 out of 175.) Corruption involves all levels of government, but benefits also from a mindset of tolerance, says Happy Feraren, the co-founder of Bantay.ph, an anti-corruption educational initiative that teaches citizens how to monitor the quality of government services, sometimes by going undercover. GO

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