Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

First POST: Leftovers

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, November 26 2012

  • Thanksgiving leftovers: Cobbler the Turkey was the winner of the first online vote for the traditional White House pardoning of the Turkey. As President Obama said during the ceremony: "Now, I joke, but for the first time in our history, the winners of the White House Turkey Pardon were chosen through a highly competitive online vote. And once again, Nate Silver completely nailed it. (Laughter.) The guy is amazing. He predicted these guys would win."

From techPresident

Around the web

International

  • Only nine countries own their national Twitter handles, according to a study.

  • British regulator Ofcom warns that action is needed to address a coming "capacity crunch" on British mobile networks.

  • British regulators are investigating the degree to which firms are monitoring online shoppers to show them different prices.

  • The Riyadh Bureau takes a closer look at reports that men in Saudi Arabia were receiving text messages about the whereabouts of women of whom they are legal guardians.

  • An American fighter with Somali militants who has been known for posting messages with hip hop chants and an online diary has been added to the FBI's most wanted list.

  • Facebook is facing a legal threat in Scandinavia over unsolicited advertising.

  • The New York Times looked at how Twitter could now be a target after it played a key role in identifying the subject of what turned to be a false and controversial BBC report accusing a British politician of sex abuse. Earlier the politician's lawyer had told the New York Times, "Let it be a lesson to everyone that trial by Internet is a very nasty way to hurt people, and it will end up costing people a lot of money.”

  • Italian police have blocked access to a white supremacist website and arrested four individuals for allegedly inciting racial hatred and spreading anti-Semitism.

  • A German court ruled that a request for legal assistance from the U.S. regarding the possibility of stripping assets from Megaupload has no basis for legal action.

  • The Australian government is considering a plan against online bullying which could mean financial penalties for Facebook and Twitter, and also allow a commissioner to issue a take-down notice for objectionable material.

  • The New York Times reported on how a Spanish soccer club in financial trouble has sold shares worldwide promoted by social media.

News Briefs

RSS Feed thursday >

NYC Open Data Advocates Focus on Quality And Value Over Quantity

The New York City Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications plans to publish more than double the amount of datasets this year than it published to the portal last year, new Commissioner Anne Roest wrote last week in an annual report mandated by the city's open data law, with 135 datasets scheduled to be released this year, and almost 100 more to come in 2015. But as preparations are underway for City Council open data oversight hearings in the fall, what matters more to advocates than the absolute number of the datasets is their quality. GO

Civic Tech and Engagement: Announcing a New Series on What Makes it "Thick"

Announcing a new series of feature articles that we will be publishing over the next several months, thanks to the support of the Rita Allen Foundation. Our focus is on digitally-enabled civic engagement, and in particular, how and under what conditions "thick" digital civic engagement occurs. What we're after is answers to this question: When does a tech tool or platform enable actual people to make ongoing and significant contributions to each other, to a place or cause, at a scale that produces demonstrable change? GO

More