Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

First POST: Leftovers

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, November 26 2012

  • Thanksgiving leftovers: Cobbler the Turkey was the winner of the first online vote for the traditional White House pardoning of the Turkey. As President Obama said during the ceremony: "Now, I joke, but for the first time in our history, the winners of the White House Turkey Pardon were chosen through a highly competitive online vote. And once again, Nate Silver completely nailed it. (Laughter.) The guy is amazing. He predicted these guys would win."

From techPresident

Around the web

International

  • Only nine countries own their national Twitter handles, according to a study.

  • British regulator Ofcom warns that action is needed to address a coming "capacity crunch" on British mobile networks.

  • British regulators are investigating the degree to which firms are monitoring online shoppers to show them different prices.

  • The Riyadh Bureau takes a closer look at reports that men in Saudi Arabia were receiving text messages about the whereabouts of women of whom they are legal guardians.

  • An American fighter with Somali militants who has been known for posting messages with hip hop chants and an online diary has been added to the FBI's most wanted list.

  • Facebook is facing a legal threat in Scandinavia over unsolicited advertising.

  • The New York Times looked at how Twitter could now be a target after it played a key role in identifying the subject of what turned to be a false and controversial BBC report accusing a British politician of sex abuse. Earlier the politician's lawyer had told the New York Times, "Let it be a lesson to everyone that trial by Internet is a very nasty way to hurt people, and it will end up costing people a lot of money.”

  • Italian police have blocked access to a white supremacist website and arrested four individuals for allegedly inciting racial hatred and spreading anti-Semitism.

  • A German court ruled that a request for legal assistance from the U.S. regarding the possibility of stripping assets from Megaupload has no basis for legal action.

  • The Australian government is considering a plan against online bullying which could mean financial penalties for Facebook and Twitter, and also allow a commissioner to issue a take-down notice for objectionable material.

  • The New York Times reported on how a Spanish soccer club in financial trouble has sold shares worldwide promoted by social media.

News Briefs

RSS Feed friday >

First POST: Net Effects

Ballooning digital campaign teams; early registration deadlines kept millions of people from voting in 2012; love letters to Obamacare; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Data-Driven

Get to know Clinton's digital team even better; Ted Cruz election announcement-related fundraising offers peak into the coming data-driven campaign arms race; New York City launches online community engagement pilot program called IdeaScale; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Too Much Information

Will Facebook become the Walmart of News?; Hillary Clinton's digital team; how easy it is to get your hands on 4.6 million license plate scans; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Firsts

Political reporters use Yik Yak to pep up stories about Ted Cruz's campaign announcement; The New York Times, Buzzfeed and National Geographic may agree to let Facebook host their news on its servers; Google fiber users to soon get targeted television ads; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Cowed

TedCruz.com for president; Meerkat fever; who does Facebook work for (probably not you); Medium, "the billionaire's typewriter"; and much, much more. GO

More