Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

First POST: What's Next

BY Miranda Neubauer | Wednesday, November 14 2012

Around the web

International

  • A number of European unions are coordinating a Europe-wide strike and protest against austerity today with the motto #14N.

  • The Committee to Protect Journalists has called on Cuban authorities to drop charges against a writer for an anti-Castro website that was reporting on detentions of government opponents and criticism of the country's response to Hurricane Sandy.

  • The new head of BBC News is asking staff not to tweet about the broadcasters' internal problems.

  • The Washington Post explored Russia's new "secret" Internet blacklist.

  • The tax authority in Hamburg has revoked the 2010 tax-exempt authority of a main financial supporter of Wikileaks.

  • The head of the Association of German Chambers of Industry and Commerce said that every third company is looking to add more IT personnel 2013, and that the industry is having trouble finding qualified workers.

News Briefs

RSS Feed thursday >

NYC Open Data Advocates Focus on Quality And Value Over Quantity

The New York City Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications plans to publish more than double the amount of datasets this year than it published to the portal last year, new Commissioner Anne Roest wrote last week in an annual report mandated by the city's open data law, with 135 datasets scheduled to be released this year, and almost 100 more to come in 2015. But as preparations are underway for City Council open data oversight hearings in the fall, what matters more to advocates than the absolute number of the datasets is their quality. GO

Civic Tech and Engagement: Announcing a New Series on What Makes it "Thick"

Announcing a new series of feature articles that we will be publishing over the next several months, thanks to the support of the Rita Allen Foundation. Our focus is on digitally-enabled civic engagement, and in particular, how and under what conditions "thick" digital civic engagement occurs. What we're after is answers to this question: When does a tech tool or platform enable actual people to make ongoing and significant contributions to each other, to a place or cause, at a scale that produces demonstrable change? GO

More