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Mitt Romney's Campaign Takes Tech "Parity" With OfA to a Whole New Level

BY Nick Judd | Monday, September 10 2012

On Aug. 25, Mitt Romney's campaign announced "Victory Wallet," which allows users who opt in to authorize one-click donations to the campaign going forward.

It was the Romney campaign's take on a feature the Obama campaign had already put in place in March, and it wasn't the first time the campaign had followed up on functionality Obama for America was first to enable. For example, Obama for America announced Jan. 30 it would be rolling out Square and a white-label version of the Square app so that the campaign could take donations more easily at events. The Romney campaign almost immediately announced it would do the same thing the following night.

When the Obama campaign announced it would enable donations via text message, it beat Team Romney by several days.

The difference here is that Romney's digital staff, led by director Zac Moffatt, seems to have taken its tit-for-tat further this time than in the past. As BuzzFeed and Salon also noted, following the klaxon call of progressive digital activists Jess Livoti-Morales and Matt Ortega, the Romney campaign was using copy on that page that is identical to the text used by Obama for America for its very same feature.

The Romney campaign did not respond to requests for comment earlier today, but staffers appear to have changed the text on the page.

This post has been corrected. The Romney campaign announced "Victory Wallet" on Aug. 25, weeks earlier than the post initially stated, and text message donations on Aug. 31, just over a week after the Obama campaign announced it had brought donations online. While the Obama campaign was first to announce it would use Square for fundraising, the Romney campaign said the same day that it would put Square to use the very next evening.

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