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First POST: Message Machines

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, August 20 2012

The "Lame" campaign

  • According to one new analysis of campaign coverage, three surrogates for the two presidential campaigns are quoted far more than any others. More disturbingly for media observers, the fourth "most quoted" source this year is the anonymous campaign statement or unnamed official. Who are those three? And what does the lack of accountability mean for the election cycle? techPresident has more.

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Watching the needle move

  • In an interview released Sunday, Republican U.S. Senate hopeful and current congressman Todd Akin said in the case of "legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down —" driving a flurry of conversation online. Nate Silver tweeted, "Is it possible to win a Senate race with 0% of the women's vote? Asking for a friend." Democrats also began promoting a petition asking him to be removed from the House Science committee. Akin posted a response on Facebook and Twitter.

Romney campaign touts a VP bump

  • The Romney campaign released a memo Friday detailing how the week following Paul Ryan's selection had played out online. Among the details: Over 124,800 online donations had raised $10,157,947, with an average donation of $81, and 68 percent were new donors. The Romney campaign had received site traffic of 2,000,000 visitors in that week with 1,560,000 hits from desktops and 440,000 from mobile devices. The Romney Facebook page received an additional 500,000 likes for a total of 4,360,000, and the Romney Twitter account received 54,000 followers for a total of 861,000. The Paul Ryan VP Facebook and Twitter accounts gained 860,000 and 118,500 likes and followers respectively. The campaign also said that over 45,000 volunteers signed up online.

Around the web

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News Briefs

RSS Feed tuesday >

First POST: Company

The global "Snowden effect" is huge; how many consumer-facing online services fail the user privacy test; the Dems' 2016 digital to-do list; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Mood Slime

The Sony email leak reveals the MPAA's campaign against Google; how Uber is lobbying in local markets; mapping the #MillionsMarchNYC; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Cloudy

What the Internet is not; new analysis of public opinion on net neutrality; how cloud backup apparently foiled a police coverup; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Records

Is the future of citizen journalism vigilantism?; one tech mogul's vocal support for CIA torture; a cri de couer from the founder of the Pirate Bay; and much, much more. GO

Web Index Sees Impact of Net Neutrality, Surveillance and Copyright Laws

Denmark, Finland, Norway, the United Kingdom and Sweden have come out on top of the Web Index, a ranking of the Web Foundation measuring the economic, social and political benefit that countries gain from the web. The United States is at number six. For the authors of the report accompanying the index, the results reflect how inequality has an impact on access to the web. "Nordic policy-makers have been quick to adopt and promote the free Internet - and open access to information - as a 21st century public good," the report states. " Others, as this year's findings show, need to move fast to catch up." The report attributes the Scandinavian countries' advantage to the countries' broader efforts to invest in public goods and establish a welfare and acting against " excess concentrations of wealth and power." With the lower inequality in those countries than in others, "the skills, means and freedoms to benefit from new technologies are widespread, which helps to explain why Scandinavian countries score highly on the political, social and economic impact of the Web GO

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