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In Russia, Religious Activists Call for Facebook Ban Over Same-Sex Marriage Icons

BY Lisa Goldman | Friday, July 20 2012

Facebook's same-sex marriage icons

Religious activists in Russia are demanding that Facebook be banned for supporting same-sex marriage. A group that belongs to the Orthodox church in southern Russia have accused the social media site of promoting "gay propaganda" following its launch of timeline icons that indicate a same-sex marriage.

After Facebook ignored a faxed demand from the group that they stop "flirting with sodomites" and remove all content that supports homosexuality, the activists launched a campaign to re-criminalize homosexuality. According to recently passed legislation, websites containing illegal or undesirable content are subject to being blacklisted, which can then lead to the site being blocked or deleted.

When Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes married his male partner earlier this month, they updated their timeline with an icon of two grooms, rather than the traditional bride and groom. It was then that users noticed the social media site had rolled out timeline icons showing two grooms or two brides couples to indicate a same-sex wedding.

As Mashable reports, Facebook has a history of supporting same-sex couples, including a partnership with Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation.

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