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Huffington Post Releases Polling Data for Developers

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, July 2 2012

The Huffington Post has begun offering API access to its polling data, a move that makes the data easily accessible to software developers, Andrei Scheinkman and Mark Blumenthal write.

The initial release contains data from more than 215,000 responses to questions coming from more than 13,000 polls. By going beyond the aggregated polling and analysis provided by other sites such as Real Clear Politics and FiveThirtyEight, the Huffington Post hopes to make polling data more transparent and in doing so help journalists, researchers and policy analysts see the "limitations and biases of polls and the organizations that conduct [polls]." In an e-mail to techPresident, Scheinkman wrote that "until now there hasn't been any up-to-date, publicly accessible database of American opinion polls ... it's all available but spread across dozens of sites and PDFs."

The data comes from the polls that The Huffington Post already publishes and graphs, compiled from various sources, on its website.

The release includes answers to general questions about views on the political direction of the country and more narrow questions about specific races. The Huffington Post has also organized the data by subject and geography into more than 200 charts. The API will also provide information about the methodology of each poll, the original source as well as the Huffington Post's estimates about opinion trends for each question.

The Huffington Post is publishing the data as an HTTP-based application programming interface, or API, with JSON and XML responses, and plans to make it available through Atom feeds and in CSV format in the future.

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