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Online Ad Targeting is Going Local

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, June 18 2012

An outside group backing a Democratic candidate for Congress in New York is using highly targeted web ads to reach potential voters. With lots of talk about targeting at the presidential level, it's worth noting as smaller campaigns adopt the same practice.

A group affiliated with Emily's List called "Women Vote!" has so far dropped $38,000 in online advertising to support Grace Meng, a candidate for the Democratic nod to replace Rep. Gary Ackerman in New York's 6th District, City and State reported last week.

Emily's List explains:

Instead of using traditional targeting methods to place ads that might reach women voters in the 6th district, WOMEN VOTE! is targeting specific individuals via their IP addresses and cookies that are commercially available and matched back to the voter file, ensuring that Democratic women who are registered to vote in NY-06, vote somewhat frequently in primaries and are between the ages of 25 and 60 receive clear information about the opportunity to send a hard-working progressive woman to Congress.

The bureau chief at TechPresident's NY-07 outpost in Queens also saw ads for Meng, who has the backing of both the incumbent Ackerman and The New York Times. The New York Daily News has endorsed one of her opponents, Assemblyman Rory Lancman, for the Democratic nod.

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