Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

How Political Donations by Text Message Might Work

BY Nick Judd | Friday, June 8 2012

The Federal Election Commission is expected today or Monday to release an advisory opinion about a company that proposes to collect political donations by text message, something that campaigns have long hoped to be able to accomplish. By all accounts, the FEC is on the verge of approving political donations via text.

The Hill reports that commissioners at a meeting yesterday mostly wondered how to make the payments approach fit within existing donation regulations, such as limits on donations to campaigns and PACs. FEC regulations also control the time frame within which a donation has to change hands.

Unlike a previous proposal to do mobile donations floated by CTIA, the wireless industry association, mobile messaging and billing aggregator m-Qube and political and media consulting firms Red Blue T and ArmourMedia would keep donations coming in from any individual number to $50 or less — which, according to an earlier draft advisory opinion from the FEC, means that the commission is satisfied that the campaign or committee getting the donation won't be taking in enough money in one month from any individual donor to run afoul of reporting requirements.

The earlier draft is here; The Hill's story outlines what commissioners wanted to hear from m-Qube and company before making a decision.

With Natalia Nedzhvetskaya

News Briefs

RSS Feed thursday >

Beyond @Congressedits, Capitol Hill Looks for Entry to Wikipedia

As he recently told techPresident, the creator of Congressedits did not aim to make Members of Congress look bad, but said he hoped that they would recognize the importance of Wikipedia as a public space and engage more with its community. "If staffers and politicians identified as Wikipedians, that would be super. You could imagine politicians' home pages with a list of their recent edits, that they would be proud of the things that they are doing." On Capitol Hill, there is in fact interest in making that vision a reality, starting off with an initial conversation that could create a framework for more Wikipedians in Congress. GO

wednesday >

In the Philippines, Citizens Go Undercover With Bantay to Monitor Public Offices

The Philippines, a country of almost 100 million, is considered among the most corrupt country in Southeast Asia, despite a boost in Transparency International's Corruption Perception Index in the past few years (from 134th in 2010 to 94th in 2013 out of 175.) Corruption involves all levels of government, but benefits also from a mindset of tolerance, says Happy Feraren, the co-founder of Bantay.ph, an anti-corruption educational initiative that teaches citizens how to monitor the quality of government services, sometimes by going undercover. GO

More