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Lori Compas, Netroots Challenger to Wisconsin Senate Republican Scott Fitzgerald, Posts Irreverent YouTube Riposte, And It Takes Off

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Monday, May 14 2012

Her husband made her do it: Lori Compas spoofs Scott Fitzgerald's comment that her husband is behind her campaign

Lori Compas, a Democrat who's challenging Wisconsin state Senate Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau) in the state's June 5 recall election, had a rather unusual Mother's Day this year: She spent at least part of the day making a YouTube video with her family.

The Netroots candidate leapt on a comment Fitzgerald made in Sunday's edition of the Wisconsin State Journal wherein he cast doubt on the independence of her campaign to seize Wisconsin's 13th District from him. He said that he thought her husband, protest groups and unions are behind it, adding: "I don't for one minute believe she is the organizing force behind this whole thing."

Compas immediately pounced on the comment with a campy video featuring her two children wearing t-shirts emblazoned with "Union Thug," and "Protest Junkie." They flanked her husband who, reading a newspaper, exclaimed: "Darn! Fitz has found us out!"

Compas makes an appearance in the video as a clueless, apron-wearing housewife with a feather duster. She then cuts in as her regular self to respond to Fitzgerald:

Hi, we've had some fun today with Scott Fitzgerald's little comment to the state journal that I could not possibly have initiated his recall, and be conducting my campaign on my own. But the reality is that I do find his comments bizarre and and a little bit offensive. I want him to know that women are perfectly capable of educating themselves about political issues and forming their own opinions, and acting on their own convictions. That should go without saying in the year 2012, but apparently he needs a little reminder. Thanks for your interest in my campaign. If you want to learn more you can go to Loricompas.org"

The move seems to be a typically smart use of social media by Compas and her allies. She had previously used Facebook to organize volunteers' signature-gathering efforts to recall Fitzgerald.

As of the end of Monday, the video in question was played more than 5,000 times.

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This post has been corrected to fix typos. Towards the latter half of the piece, Lori Compas' name was misspelled.

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