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An Apology to Bob Woodward

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, April 6 2012

For a few minutes earlier today, a draft post that I am still working on was accidentally published on this site. The draft was tentatively titled, "Did Bob Woodward Make Up His Anti-Yale Internet Story?" and was on the question raised earlier this week by Woodward at the American Society of Newspaper Editors, about how Watergate might have unfolded differently if the Internet had existed then. I have egg on my face, since the story was not finished when it was accidentally published, and I was in the process of tracking down various participants for their comments. I could blame Drupal for reverting to a default setting after I made a small change in the draft, but that would be bogus. I messed up.

I'm going to publish this piece later this weekend or on Monday (it's Passover in my household), with a fuller account and a fairer headline. But in the meantime, given the chance that you may have read the draft (and I know Woodward did): my deep regret for the error.

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