Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

Ahead of Russian Elections, a Hope that Tech Will Keep Them Clean

BY Raphael Majma | Monday, February 27 2012

Polls are currently predicting that Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin will win the March 4 first round Presidential election by a comfortable margin, and some online activists are hoping that their election-monitoring projects will keep the election clean.

The Rosvybory project promises to train people in becoming election observers and help them with the paperwork necessary to qualify as official election monitors. The project is the latest product of Alexei Navalny, a blogger turned activist whose previous efforts, RosPil and RosYama, followed a similar vein of anti-corruption efforts. Currently, the site has registered over 16,000 citizen volunteers. (Through a spokesperson, Navalny declined to comment.)

Yabloko, a social liberal party, wants voters to be able to take these tools with them in to the polling station. The ”I am an Observer” Android and iPhone app, created by Appsolute in conjunction with the Yabloko party, provides information on what observers need to look out for when monitoring a polling station. The app gives monitors a “cheat sheet” for each period of the voting process, including before the station opens, during the voting period, and when ballots are counted. The app also lets users send video, photo, and text-based information to a team of lawyers that are tasked with acting against potential fraud.

Even Putin is taking advantage of the trend to try and stem public distrust over the veracity of the election. He is expected to provide approximately 35,000 election observers and has currently installed a massive network of 54,000 cameras to monitor election-polling centers. The total number of cameras will reach approximately 182,000, which will stream footage of “ballot boxes and vote-counting” on election day.

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: Responding

The aftermath of Ferguson continues to reverberate; how one Senate campaign took advantage of Facebook's micro-targeting tools; the new Congress' tech agenda; and much, much more GO

tuesday >

First POST: Sad Reality

How social media changed the course of the Ferguson story; Ready for Hillary's 3-million-member email list; why Mark Cuban opposes net neutrality rules; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: All Against All

Why Uber isn't "the future" of cities; why journalists lost control of journalism; how Sean Parker is spending his political money; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Power Frames

The differences between "old power" and "new power"; Uber as a new/old power hybrid; debating Clay Shirky's feminist cred; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Creeping

Senator Al Franken's tough questions for Uber's CEO; how the NSA could make its phone metadata program permanent; global privacy groups launch a personal spyware catcher called Detekt; and much, much more. GO

Recreation.gov and other Govt Projects Move Toward Embracing New Digital Approach

A draft request for proposals for the revamping of Recreation.gov will include a requirement that reservation availability data be publicly accessible and that all proposals detail how they will enable third-party sales, as two members of the United States Digital Services have joined the government team overseeing the RFP, meeting some key demands of civic technologists and consumer oriented technology companies. GO

More