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Barack Obama's "Story of Us," Told Through a Computer Screen

BY Nick Judd | Friday, February 10 2012

To commemorate the fifth anniversary of the day Barack Obama announced his candidacy for presidency of the United States, his campaign has released this video, which has some stylistic similarities to Google's unfailingly optimistic ad spots in the same way many videos in this election season so far have resembled action movie trailers:

The Obama ad, put together in-house, does many of the same things the latest series of Google ads does: It tells its story through screenshots of YouTube videos playing, emails being read and links clicked. (The Obama spot ads tumblrs reblogged to that list.)

At one point, an offscreen, uncaptioned voice — gang, help me out, who is that? — says, "He's the first candidate we've ever seen who had an organization that brought together the Internet and community organizing."

Compare that ad to Google Chrome's "Dear Sophie" spot, which first ran back in May and set the tone for several ads since:

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