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First POST: Clips

BY Miranda Neubauer | Wednesday, December 14 2011

  • Time looks at how online video archives are changing 2012 campaigns:

    The 2008 presidential campaign was sometimes called the YouTube Election because it was the first White House contest held since the creation of the ubiquitous video site. And YouTube helped shape the political identities of 2008′s major players with its viral video hits like the pro-Obama celebrity mash-up Yes We Can. While that dynamic persists — parodies of Rick Perry’s latest TV ad, for instance, currently abound — so far, the 2012 campaign has been dominated by a very different online-video novelty: easily searchable digital archival footage.

  • The Obama campaign is encouraging supporters to make donations in honor of their conservative relatives.

  • Code for America has received a $1.5 million grant from Google.

  • Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt says the SOPA bill would "criminalize linking and the fundamental structure of the Internet itself."

  • International organizations like the United Nations and the International Monetary Fund are worried about cybersquatters using their names as a result of ICANN's top-level domain expansion.

  • The National Transportation Safety Board recommends a nationwide ban on all cell phone use while driving.

  • Last week, lawmakers sent a letter to Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg asking for details on the social network's privacy practices.

  • Journalists can now live-tweet in U.K. courts without prior permission.

  • New York is moving forward with a plan to create a state-wide database to track students academically.

  • California has created a special unit to fight cybercrime, the state attorney general announced yesterday.

  • The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Developmenthas called on its member countries to "promote and protect the global free flow of information” online, the New York Times reported. "The O.E.C.D. , a group of 34 developed countries, urged policy makers to support investment in digital networks and to take a light touch on regulation, saying this was essential for promoting economic growth via the Internet," according to the Times.

  • The Vice President of the European Commission, Neelie Kroes, has responded to criticism regarding her choice of former German defense minister Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg as an adviser to the EU's new Internet freedom campaign. German Internet activists in particular had mocked the choice of Guttenberg, who had to resign after allegations that he plagiarized his doctoral thesis. There's now a wiki site devoted to highlighting his plagiarisms. He has also favored blocking access to websites accused of hosting child pornography, advocating measures that Internet activists have deemed to be ineffective and overbroad.

  • Egypt has dropped some of the charges against activist and blogger Alaa Abd El Fattah, the New York Times reports.

  • Google is tracking the aftermath of Japan's tsunami on Street View.

  • Northwestern University has been mapping the Congo elections, which have had a controversial result.

  • Following Tunisia's revolution, Bloomberg investigates the e-mail tracking apparatus used under the deposed regime.

News Briefs

RSS Feed thursday >

NYC Open Data Advocates Focus on Quality And Value Over Quantity

The New York City Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications plans to publish more than double the amount of datasets this year than it published to the portal last year, new Commissioner Anne Roest wrote last week in an annual report mandated by the city's open data law, with 135 datasets scheduled to be released this year, and almost 100 more to come in 2015. But as preparations are underway for City Council open data oversight hearings in the fall, what matters more to advocates than the absolute number of the datasets is their quality. GO

Civic Tech and Engagement: Announcing a New Series on What Makes it "Thick"

Announcing a new series of feature articles that we will be publishing over the next several months, thanks to the support of the Rita Allen Foundation. Our focus is on digitally-enabled civic engagement, and in particular, how and under what conditions "thick" digital civic engagement occurs. What we're after is answers to this question: When does a tech tool or platform enable actual people to make ongoing and significant contributions to each other, to a place or cause, at a scale that produces demonstrable change? GO

monday >

Tweets2Rue Helps Homeless to Help Themselves Through Twitter

While most solutions to homelessness focus on addressing physical needs -- a roof over the head and food to eat -- one initiative in France known as Tweets2Rue knows that for the homeless, a house is still not a home, so to speak: the homeless are often entrenched in a viscous cycle of social isolation that keeps them invisible and powerless. GO

Oakland's Sudo Mesh Looks to Counter Censorship and Digital Divide With a Mesh Network

In Oakland, a city with deep roots in radical activism and a growing tech scene at odds with the hyper-capital-driven Silicon Valley, those at the Sudo Room hackerspace believe that the solution to a wide range of problems, from censorship to the digital divide, is a mesh net, a type of decentralized network that is resilient to censorship and disruption and can also bring connectivity to poor communities.

GO

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