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First POST: Wager

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, December 12 2011

  • ABC reported that Mitt Romney's statement at Saturday's debate that he would bet Rick Perry $10,000 about his book's statements on health care saw a lot of response on Twitter. The DCCC was promoting the hashtag #what10kbuys on Twitter. (via @greeterdan). .

  • As an aside: TechPresident is surprised there isn't a Mitt Romney Betting On Things tumblr yet.

  • Rick Perry's ad opposing gay rights continues to make waves as some Internet users suggest he was wearing the same jacket as Heath Ledger in Brokeback Mountain, while others suggested that the music in the ad was similar to that of Aaron Copland, the gay leftist musician.

  • After around 50,000 people protested in Russia this Saturday against the parliamentary election results, President Dmitry Medvedev posted on Facebook that while he "did not agree with either the slogans or statements heard at the rallies," he would issued instructions for all official reports on the conduct of the polls to be checked, according to the BBC. The BBC then reported that 7,000 comments had appeared under the post by Sunday evening that appeared divided between hostility, support and neutrality.

  • Ahead of the protests, both supporters and opponents of the Putin government had been using the web to promote their point of view, as the New York Times reported. In one example the Times pointed out, pro-Putin supporters appear to have created a video on Youtube in which the protesters seem to be equated to the orcs attacking the heroes of Middle Earth in The Two Towers, the second Lord of the Rings film. Both Reuters and the New York Times also explored the role of Alexei Navalny, the arrested blogger who has inspired many of the protests.

  • Several news organizations are objecting to a ban on the use of online and phone communication at the preliminary court hearing tomorrow regarding Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.

  • After an uproar over derogatory comments made on Facebook by New York City police officers, a City Council member plans to introduce a bill that would require officers to live in New York City, arguing that they would be more respectful of diverse members of the community, while the AP reports on the free speech questions raised by the issue.

  • David Carr writes in the New York Times that the "Oregon blogger" did not deserve journalistic protection because she did not conduct herself ethically and was spreading misinformation.

  • As first reported by techdirt, the federal government seems to be acknowledging that it was incorrect when it seized the domain of a hip-hop blog last year.

  • Adweek speaks to Senator Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) on his objections to SOPA and Protect IP. At the same time, Republican congressional aides have joined lobbying groups that support the proposals.

  • The House has passed a bill that could allow Internet users to share their Netflix queues on Facebook.

  • The 24-year-old village president of South Orange is using technology to make government more accessible.

  • A British member of parliament apologized on Twitter for attending a party in France with a man dressed up as a Nazi.

  • Last week, the House Committee on Foreign Affairs held a hearing on promoting global Internet freedom, where among others, Rebecca MacKinnon, the co-founder of Global Voices Online, gave testimony.

  • The German minister of consumer protection has written a letter to the U.S. government alleging that Facebook is not following international privacy protection laws. (in German)

  • Michael Bloomberg congratulated @ElBloombito on Twitter for winning an award for Best Parody from Village Voice.

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