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Why Didn't Facebook Waive "Sponsored Post" Fees for Hurricane Sandy Relief?

BY Lea Zeltserman | Wednesday, November 7 2012

South Ferry subway station under water, the day after Hurricane Sandy (credit: MTAPhotos)
As the full scope of the disaster wrought by Hurricane Sandy sank in, volunteers in New York and New Jersey dropped everything to help the thousands evacuated from homes that were flooded, freezing and without electricity; many put out urgent calls for supplies and volunteers on Facebook, but their posts failed to reach a wide audience because the social media site did not suspend its fees for promoting posts — even as the New York Times and Wall Street Journal lowered their paywall in order to give people in the disaster-struck region access to information. Read More

WeGov

How the New York Times Uses Citizen Media to Watch "Syria's War"

BY Lisa Goldman | Monday, July 16 2012

Source: YouTube via nytimes.com.

Forced to watch ongoing violence and unrest in Syria from afar, the New York Times launched "Watching Syria's War," an interactive page that presents, parses and explains videos coming out of the country from a growing group of activists and everyday citizens. In an edited interview with Lisa Goldman, page editor J David Goodman explains how the project works, from the way the Times breaks down what is or isn't credible for its visitors to what the entire endeavor might say about the future of conflict reporting. Read More

New York Times Collates Syrian Opposition's Citizen Journalist Reports

BY Lisa Goldman | Friday, July 13 2012

Source: NYTimes.com

The New York Times online has created an ambitious, information-rich page that aggregates video clips and tweets posted by both citizen journalists who support the Syrian opposition and official government media outlets. Watching Syria's War is updated several times each day. The project is particularly timely in that it attempts to bridge the gap between independently verified information and information that is disseminated by interested parties with an agenda. Syria is a bit of a black box at the best of times, but since the civil war began over one year ago it has been particularly difficult to obtain accurate information. Reporters are prevented from entering Syria or, when they do obtain a visa, from moving about the country freely. Read More

The New York Times' Chinese Social Media Account is Suspended

BY Lisa Goldman | Tuesday, July 10 2012

Mashable reports that the Chinese government shut down the New York Times' social media experiment just one week after it was launched. The Times launched its Chinese language edition at the end of June, targeting educated, affluent Chinese and promising to remain true to its high journalistic standards despite Chinese censorship of online content. Concurrently, the Times set up official accounts on popular Chinese social media platforms. So far the Chinese government has allowed free access to the news site, but it shut down its official account on Sina Weibo, a popular social media platform that is described as a hybrid of Facebook and Twitter. Read More

#911Plus10: The Way We Look (and Feel) to Us All

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, September 8 2011

If you haven't already, drop everything and take a few minutes to immerse yourself in an interactive map hosted by The New York Times that is collecting the memories and moods of people as they wrestle with the tenth ... Read More

Rapid @-Response

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, July 21 2011

House Speaker John Boehner tries to bust the breaking news. Read More

Participants Annoyed at How 'Wikileaks' Gitmo Docs Got Out

BY Nancy Scola | Monday, April 25 2011

Pentagon press secretary Geof Morrell When it comes to Wikileaks, there's the story, and then there's the backstory. Today, you might have noticed, we've seen a sudden deluge of news stories on just who has been held at ... Read More

"Protest! I Said, Protest!"

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, March 25 2011

So, that New York Times lede that had a Beijing entrepreneur getting his cell phone turned off by authorities when he quoted Hamlet -- "the lady doth protest too much" -- might not hold up. The blog Shanghai ... Read More

How One Man With a Laptop Counts the Afghanistan War Dead

BY Nick Judd | Monday, November 22 2010

The New York Times' Noam Cohen had a story yesterday about Michael White, a programmer, whose iCasualties.org, where he keeps a tally of the dead and injured among coalition forces in Iraq and Afghanistan, is widely used ... Read More