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New Hampshire Legislature Passes Open-Source Software Bill

BY Raphael Majma | Friday, February 10 2012

The New Hampshire state legislature recently passed a bill that makes open data and open source software included by default in the state's procurement process.

The bill, HB 418, requires government officials to consider open-source products when making new technology acquisitions and only purchase products that comply with open data standards. Last year, Nick Judd covered how the New Hampshire legislature changed with the addition of several “geeks” to the House of Representatives and the passage of this new legislation shows a growing culture of friendliness to the tech concept of “open” in the statehouse. It is currently on its way to the governor's desk for signing.

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In New Hampshire, Voters Send In the Geeks

BY Nick Judd | Wednesday, February 2 2011

The New Hampshire state legislature, called the General Court, saw an influx of technologists this year. Photo: Joe Hardenbrook / Flickr The New Hampshire state legislature is a whole lot geekier this year. Swept into ... Read More

New Hampshire Opens its State's Legislative Data

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, February 1 2011

Chalk up a new one for the open-government-data geeks. In the past few days, New Hampshire's General Court, as the state legislature is officially known, started releasing data on legislation and legislators in ... Read More

Daily Digest: Google Announces Political Checkout

BY Joshua Levy | Thursday, January 17 2008

Round ups of the conservative blogosphere make it clear that the GOP contest is wide open; Ron Paul supporters may be getting the shaft on Digg and PayPal; Ars Technica decides the New Hampshire vote controversy isn't a ... Read More

Fleshy Handshakes vs. Virtual Handshakes

BY Alan Rosenblatt | Thursday, January 10 2008

Declan McCullagh suggested yesterday that it was the offline efforts, not the online efforts that won the day in New Hampshire Tuesday: "In other words, it was anything but high-tech. Sure, there were robo-calls and ... Read More

Screenshots from the Final Sprint

BY Patrick Ruffini | Wednesday, January 9 2008

Over the last few days, I've been compiling screenshots of the candidate homepages and interesting things the candidates are doing on their sites to memorialize what these sites were like in the campaign's final sprint. ... Read More

Two Online Docs Go Long

BY Joshua Levy | Tuesday, January 8 2008

I love political videos on YouTube as much as anyone, but sometimes the filmmaker in me yearns for something more than one- or two-minute voter-generated videos in support of one candidate or against another. The ... Read More

A Tidal Wave Ahead?

BY Editors | Tuesday, January 8 2008

The campaign that begins tomorrow, with expensive states like Florida and South Carolina coming before the “Tsunami Tuesday” of February 5th, will require millions in staff, direct mail, and television advertising. ... Read More

Obama Is King of Google, Duke of YouTube

BY Joshua Levy | Monday, January 7 2008

According to Google Trends, Barack Obama has been the subject of more Google searches than any other presidential candidate, and aside from Ron Paul and Mike Huckabee he blows everyone else out of the water. And he's ... Read More

Daily Digest: The Barocket Is Back!

BY Joshua Levy | Monday, January 7 2008

While we were sleeping, there was a Wyoming primary, but few candidates mention the results on their sites; The Barocket is back! Barack Obama's online popularity has skyrocketed since his win in Iowa; Facebook's role in ... Read More

News Briefs

RSS Feed tuesday >

First POST: Sad Reality

How social media changed the course of the Ferguson story; Ready for Hillary's 3-million-member email list; why Mark Cuban opposes net neutrality rules; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: All Against All

Why Uber isn't "the future" of cities; why journalists lost control of journalism; how Sean Parker is spending his political money; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Power Frames

The differences between "old power" and "new power"; Uber as a new/old power hybrid; debating Clay Shirky's feminist cred; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Creeping

Senator Al Franken's tough questions for Uber's CEO; how the NSA could make its phone metadata program permanent; global privacy groups launch a personal spyware catcher called Detekt; and much, much more. GO

Recreation.gov and other Govt Projects Move Toward Embracing New Digital Approach

A draft request for proposals for the revamping of Recreation.gov will include a requirement that reservation availability data be publicly accessible and that all proposals detail how they will enable third-party sales, as two members of the United States Digital Services have joined the government team overseeing the RFP, meeting some key demands of civic technologists and consumer oriented technology companies. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Ubermenschens

Surge-pricing in effect for Uber privacy violations; why "privacy" policies should be called "data usage" policies; pols silent on Uber mess; and much, much more. GO

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