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Jim Gilliam's Viral Video as 'Radical Sincerity'

BY Nick Judd | Wednesday, June 8 2011

Jim Gilliam. Photo: Esty Stein / Personal Democracy Forum Yesterday, Jim Gilliam demonstrated the power of something one could maybe call "radical sincerity." Read More

Jim Gilliam Explains: 'The Internet is My Religion'

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, June 7 2011

A few minutes ago, Jim Gilliam stood up in front of the crowd of about 900 800 people here at Personal Democracy Forum 2011 and shared a personal story about how the Internet helped him restore his faith — and his ... Read More

Turning Data into Stories in Italy

BY Nancy Scola | Wednesday, November 24 2010

Down in the comments on yesterday's post about whether story telling is an undergrown part of the open government movement, at present, Italy's Alberto Cottica makes the case that data advocates working within the ... Read More

Is the Open Data Movement Giving Story Telling Short Shrift?

BY Nancy Scola | Tuesday, November 23 2010

Tim Berners Lee in a 2009 photo by Silvio Tanaka Movements to free vast caches of data from the greedy clutches of the public section are popping up all over the world, as one look at the Read More

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Beyond @Congressedits, Capitol Hill Looks for Entry to Wikipedia

As he recently told techPresident, the creator of Congressedits did not aim to make Members of Congress look bad, but said he hoped that they would recognize the importance of Wikipedia as a public space and engage more with its community. "If staffers and politicians identified as Wikipedians, that would be super. You could imagine politicians' home pages with a list of their recent edits, that they would be proud of the things that they are doing." On Capitol Hill, there is in fact interest in making that vision a reality, starting off with an initial conversation that could create a framework for more Wikipedians in Congress. GO

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In the Philippines, Citizens Go Undercover With Bantay to Monitor Public Offices

The Philippines, a country of almost 100 million, is considered among the most corrupt country in Southeast Asia, despite a boost in Transparency International's Corruption Perception Index in the past few years (from 134th in 2010 to 94th in 2013 out of 175.) Corruption involves all levels of government, but benefits also from a mindset of tolerance, says Happy Feraren, the co-founder of Bantay.ph, an anti-corruption educational initiative that teaches citizens how to monitor the quality of government services, sometimes by going undercover. GO

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