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First POST: Don't Spill Anything

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, March 6 2014

More on why the CIA may have snooped on Senate staffers; StopFake.org is trying expose misinformation about Ukraine; Twitter users have a laugh on British PM David Cameron; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Heat List

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, February 20 2014

The FCC offers new rules to protect net neutrality; Homeland Security backs down on license plate tracking; the Facebook-WhatsApp deal; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Lip Reading

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, February 3 2014

Journalism after Snowden; Canada's unfolding spying scandal; PopVox's bright future; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Juggernautism

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, November 4 2013

Google chairman Eric Schmidt calls the NSA's actions "outrageous"; the inside story of how Beltway politics doomed the launch of HealthCare.gov; Comcast's bid to knock out Seattle's mayor; and much, much more. Read More

Google Fiber Planned for Third City, Signal of New Power for Cities Bargaining for Broadband

BY Nick Judd | Wednesday, April 17 2013

Google has announced that Provo, Utah will become the third city in the U.S. to get Google Fiber, the search company's entry into broadband Internet and TV service. Read More

Will "Microtrenching" Realize New York City's Gigabit Dreams?

BY Sam Roudman | Wednesday, April 10 2013

The imposing serrated blade of a saw cuts a line through a slab of concrete in lower Manhattan, pushing a grey slurry of runoff towards the sewer with a deafening peal. Until now, installing fiber-optic cable in the city required saws like this one to cut up a chunk of street two to three feet wide and as many as six feet deep, disrupting traffic and brutalizing ears in the process. But the future of broadband access in New York City might be trenches about an inch wide. With the city’s blessing, Verizon started a pilot project to install fiber using a process called "microtrenching," which fits fiber-optic cables in a trench dug into the space separating the curb from the actual sidewalk. The goal of the pilot is to expand the availability of gigabit-speed fiber to residents and businesses, while reducing the inconvenience and cost of installation. Read More

Public Broadband May Be Coming to Harford County, Maryland

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, July 12 2011

Harford County, Maryland, may get a low-cost community wireless network, GovtTech reports: The $8 million proposal would consolidate existing networks into a single, secure high-speed IP network providing Internet, ... Read More

The Political Fight Over Public Broadband Arrives in Wisconsin

BY Nick Judd | Monday, June 13 2011

Ars Technica has an in-depth look at a legislative battle now in progress over the fate of a public broadband network for Wisconsin's state schools and libraries: As we go to press with this story, WiscNet is negotiating ... Read More

Free Wi-Fi Coming to New York City Parks

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, June 9 2011

Free wi-fi is coming to 20 New York City parks as part of a partnership with AT&T, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced on his website today. From the site: “In May, we laid out a strategy to make New York City the ... Read More

Getting All the World to Strike in Raleigh: Lessig Calls for Campaign Against N.C. Muni Broadband Bill

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, May 20 2011

Photo credit: Graeme Pow Famed law professor and activist Larry Lessig is harnessing his new Rootstrikers brand to go after something close to his online audience's heart -- a bill in North Carolina passed by the state ... Read More

Transparency and Public Shaming: Pakistan Tackles Tax Evasion

In Pakistan, where only one in 200 citizens files their income tax return, authorities published a directory of taxpayers' details for the first time. Officials explained the decision as an attempt to shame defaulters into paying up.

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wednesday >

Facebook Seeks Approval as Financial Service in Ireland. Is the Developing World Next?

On April 13 the Financial Times reported that Facebook is only weeks away from being approved as a financial service in Ireland. Is this foray into e-money motivated by Facebook's desire to conquer the developing world before other corporate Internet giants do? Maybe.

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The Rise and Fall of Iran's “Blogestan”

The robust community of Iranian bloggers—sometimes nicknamed “Blogestan”—has shrunk since its heyday between 2002 – 2010. “Whither Blogestan,” a recent report from the University of Pennsylvania's Iran Media Program sought to find out how and why. The researchers performed a web crawling analysis of Blogestan, survey 165 Persian blog users, and conducted 20 interviews with influential bloggers in the Persian community. They found multiple causes of the decline in blogging, including increased social media use and interference from authorities.

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tuesday >

Weekly Readings: What the Govt Wants to Know

A roundup of interesting reads and stories from around the web. GO

Russia to Treat Bloggers Like Mass Media Because "the F*cking Journalists Won't Stop Writing"

The worldwide debate over who is and who isn't a journalist has raged since digital media made it much easier for citizen journalists and other “amateurs” to compete with the big guys. In the United States, journalists are entitled to certain protections under the law, such as the right to confidential sources. As such, many argue that blogging should qualify as journalism because independent writers deserve the same legal protections as corporate employees. In Russia, however, earning a place equal to mass media means additional regulations and obligations, which some say will lead to the repression of free speech.

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Politics for People: Demanding Transparent and Ethical Lobbying in the EU

Today the Alliance for Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Regulation (ALTER-EU) launched a campaign called Politics for People that asks candidates for the European Parliament to pledge to stand up to secretive industry lobbyists and to advocate for transparency. The Politics for People website connects voters with information about their MEP candidates and encourages them to reach out on Facebook, Twitter or by email to ask them to sign the pledge.

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monday >

Security Agencies Given Full Access to Telecom Data Even Though "All Lebanese Can Not Be Suspects"

In late March, Lebanese government ministers granted security agencies unrestricted access to telecommunications data in spite of some ministers objections that it violates privacy rights. Global Voices reports that the policy violates Lebanon's existing surveillance and privacy law, Law 140, but has gotten little coverage from the country's mainstream media.

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friday >

In Google Hangout, NYC Mayor de Blasio Talks Tech and Outer Borough Potential

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio followed the lead of President Obama and New York City Council member Ben Kallos Friday by participating in a Google Hangout to help mark his first 100 days in office, in which the conversation focused on expanding access to technology opportunities through education and ensuring that the needs of the so-called "outer boroughs" aren't overlooked. GO

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