You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

NationBuilder Signs Software Deal with RSLC, Some Progressives Call for a "Boycott"

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Thursday, July 12 2012

A core group of progressive political strategists are in some cases boycotting the political software firm NationBuilder and in others are steering business elsewhere after the company announced it had reached a deal with the Republican State Leadership Committee.

"At this point, I don't think it's in the interest of progressive causes and candidates to keep supporting a platform that's basically taking a side," Raven Brooks told techPresident. Brooks is the executive director of Netroots Nation, a conference that thousands of left-leaning bloggers, activists and Democratic strategists attend each year to brush up on their organizing and movement-building skills.

NationBuilder sells low-cost, web-based software for movements, including political campaigns. The deal upsets people on the left because co-founders Jim Gilliam and Joe Green both have pedigrees in progressive politics: Gilliam co-founded Robert Greenwald's Brave New Films, and Green, a founder of Causes, was regional field director in northwest Arizona for Sen. John Kerry's 2004 presidential campaign.

Read More

Campaigns & Elections Magazine Announces "CampaignTech Innovators"

BY Miranda Neubauer | Thursday, April 5 2012

Campaigns & Elections magazine has announced its 2012 CampaignTech Innovators in the areas of campaigns, advocacy, Capitol Hill and nonpartisan innovation. Candidates are nominated by their peers. The winners "all demonstrate a visionary approach to the future of digital politics and advocacy," according to Campaigns and Elections. The recipients will officially receive the awards on April 19 at the CampaignTech Conference in Washington D.C., and most of the names will be familiar to regular techPresident readers. Read More

How CNN Demeans the Internet

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, November 29 2007

The “YouTube debates” are neither real debates, nor a serious use of the internet's potential. Worse, as blogger Jason Rosenbaum cogently argues, "By heavily moderating the questions, and by deliberately choosing ... Read More