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First POST: Scenarios

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, February 6 2015

Inside the campaign to defend net neutrality; NBC's Brian Williams' credibility under attack by social media; Twitter's plans to police abuse and trolls; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

Poderopedia to Increase Transparency in South America's Most Corrupt Country

BY Jessica McKenzie | Friday, May 2 2014

An illustration from the Poderopedia video, below

How a wealthy Chilean politician is making sure his son isn't punished to the full extent of the law for manslaughter after he hit and killed a pedestrian while driving drunk. Exposing the chairman of the Senate Energy Committee who also leases land to energy companies. Fact checking the 2013 presidential debates and live-tweeting the results. These are just a few of the stories made possible by Poderopedia, a platform on which journalists use public information and investigative reporting to build profiles of major political and financial players, and then map their familial ties, business connections, and other potential conflicts of interest. The second chapter of Poderopedia will launch in Venezuela tomorrow, on World Press Freedom Day, and another chapter will launch in Colombia before June. Poderopedia is finally on its way to world domination.

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WeGov

YanukovychLeaks.org Exposes a Corrupt and Violent Regime

BY Antonella Napolitano | Wednesday, March 5 2014

Picture courtesy of Fundacja ePaƄstwo

Thousands of documents float and sink in a remote reservoir not far from a grand 345-acre estate contained within a sprawling wrought iron fence. As evocative as it may seem, this not the beginning of a spy thriller, but of Yanukovych Leaks, an online portal where the leaks have been uploaded by investigative journalists who say the extravagance detailed in those papers may prove ousted President Viktor Yanukovych's depth of corruption. Read More

The New Yorker Hopes "Strongbox" Is a Wiretap-Proof Sieve for Leaks

BY Miranda Neubauer | Thursday, May 16 2013

The New Yorker yesterday became the first outlet to implement DeadDrop, a new system for sources to submit information to journalists online in a more secure and anonymous way than, for example, email. Read More