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WeGov

Following Government Orders, Tajikistan's Telecoms Have Blocked Facebook

BY Lisa Goldman | Tuesday, November 27 2012

Facebook is now totally blocked in Tajikistan. Starting from last week, the Ministry of Communications ordered the country's six mobile service providers and six Internet service providers to block access to the popular social media platform. Read More

WeGov

U.A.E. Passes New Law Prescribing Mandatory Jail Time for Online Dissidents

BY Lisa Goldman | Tuesday, November 13 2012

The United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.) is cracking down on dissent with a new law that stipulates jail time for anyone who criticizes the government online, reports the Global Arab Network. Read More

WeGov

Iranian Gov't Blocks Downloading of Foreign Media Files

BY Lisa Goldman | Monday, October 8 2012

The Iranian government is now blocking the downloading of MP3, MP4, AVI and SWF files hosted on foreign servers, reports Storify Middle East. Read More

WeGov

Tunisia Announces Intention to End Internet Censorship

BY Lisa Goldman | Thursday, September 13 2012

Nearly two years after the ousting of long-time authoritarian leader Ben Ali, Tunisia has announced that Internet censorship will be lifted. Under Ben Ali, Tunisia was classified by Reporters Without Borders as an Enemy of the Internet. Many restrictions have been eased since the revolution, but there are signs that the government has not really stopped snooping. Read More

WeGov

Burma Liberalizes Internet Access, But Connectivity Remains out of Reach for the Vast Majority

BY Lisa Goldman | Tuesday, September 11 2012

The Burmese government is lifting media censorship and lowering the cost of Internet access, but the cost remains prohibitive for most people in this impoverished nation. Freedom House examines the pros and cons of digital liberation in Burma in a report authored by a researcher who recently spent 10 days meeting activists in Rangoon. Read More

Announcing techPresident's "Politics and the Internet" Timeline

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, August 14 2012

We're happy to announce techPresident's "Politics and the Internet" timeline, a living archive tracking how technology has started to change politics, government and civic life in the United States, worldwide and online, from 1968 to present. The timeline is an eclectic list of people, ideas and events that our editors have compiled according to our own sense of what has mattered most. It is a work-in-progress. If you would like to suggest an important development that we may have missed, or make a correction to the record, please use this form. Read More

Where Did the Internet Really Come From?

BY Steve Crocker | Friday, August 3 2012

Steve Crocker (foreground, and in the illustration) in 2007. Photo: Veni Markovski

Gordon Crovitz has argued that the government really played no role in the creation of the Internet, and others are looking to renegotiate the role of government in its future. To properly understand where the Internet is going, and maybe where it should, techPresident asked Steve Crocker to give his account of the global network's true origins.

Crocker was a UCLA graduate student who helped create the ARPANET back in the late 1960s, and is today the chair of the board of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, ICANN.

He writes, "Could the Internet have been created by private industry? Without government’s help as funder and convenor? I don’t think so. Here’s why."

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New Rice University Paper Chronicles Impact of the Internet On U.S. Foreign Policy

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Tuesday, May 22 2012

We all know that the Internet has transformed the way that the United States conducts diplomacy, and the way that it views national security, but where should we look to find evidence of this? This is the wide-ranging subject matter of a new paper published on Tuesday by Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy. The paper provides a round-up of some of the major turns of events between 2005 and 2011 in the realms of Internet governance, the development of online public diplomacy at the State Department, the evolution of the Internet-fueled Arab Spring, and the establishment of the shadowy U.S. Cyber Command in Fort Meade, Maryland, among other things. Read More

New Wikileaks Release Helps Explain Who's Reading Your Email, and How

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, December 1 2011

Here and there, outlets like Wired's Threat Level blog or the Washington Post, with an ongoing focus on privacy in the Internet age, have peeled at the edges of the veneer that sits atop a vast and sophisticated ... Read More

The Long Arm of American Copyright Enforcement Efforts Reaches Across the Atlantic

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, July 5 2011

The U.S.'s Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency is going after website owners on piracy charges if they are using a .com or .net domain, regardless of where they are in the world or where their sites are hosted, ... Read More