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WeGov

How To Win Friends & Influence People on Twitter: The International Organizations Edition

BY Jessica McKenzie | Tuesday, December 17 2013

A new Twiplomacy study came out last month, and this time the communications firm Burson-Marstellar tackled international organizations. The study found big differences in terms of followers and retweets between the most popular international organizations on Twitter and the average international organization. For example, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (@CERN) and the United Nations Children's Fund led the crowd in terms of retweets, averaging 100 a tweet. The median average of retweets is only four. So what are those organization doing right?

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WeGov

In the Congo, War and Embargo Complicate World Bank Project

BY Rebecca Chao | Monday, December 16 2013

The provincial budget minister talks to the press after a generally assembly and budget vote (Credit: World Bank)

The war-ravaged province of South Kivu sits at the eastern border of the DRC, beside the stem of Tanganyika, an African Great Lake. Boris Weber, team leader for the World Bank's ICT4Gov, explains to techPresident that after years of conflict and violence in the province, the provincial government was simply not sending the money allocated to local governments. “Partly, they just didn’t have any incentive to send it. Also, they had no way of knowing and tracking how their money was going to be spent.” The World Bank’s participatory budgeting program, piloted in 2012, aimed to resolve that dilemma by giving those in Bukavu a direct say in how they wanted to see their budget spent; therefore creating the accountability needed to incentivize the provincial government to send money down the line. But locals view the program with a skeptic eye and ask, is it enough? Read More

WeGov

Can Do-It-Yourself Biology Change Science or Save a Life?

BY Carola Frediani | Friday, December 13 2013

Taking the lab home. (Credit: Z33 art centre, Hasselt/flickr)

They are rebels with a cause, fighting for open science. Each of them do it in their own way. Still, they all have a common goal: to change the way in which science is practiced, the way its results are distributed and even who gets to participate. It’s a loose movement made up of a new breed of scientists such as the Italian veterinary virologist Ilaria Capua, who challenged the World Health Organization’s policies on sharing data and created a global consortium of scientists who sought to foster international sharing of avian influenza data. Capua’s stand was an act of rebellion against institutional science, a victory for open biology and the start of a new type of scientific research enabled by the Internet and ICT tools, through which international cooperation could be reached by online data sharing. And yes, it was a way of hacking biology.

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WeGov

Internet Freedom Dominates Debate at International Telecommunications Union Conference in Dubai

BY Julia Wetherell | Friday, December 14 2012

Dr Hamadoun I. Touré, Secretary-General, ITU, speaking at the closing ceremony at WCIT 2012 (credit: ITU/Flickr)

As we reported Monday, the ITU was negotiating revisions to its 1988 international communications treaty this week in Dubai. Now controversial measures added to the treaty on the governance of the Internet have thwarted a consensus. Read More

WeGov

Examining eDiplomacy: Like it or Not, It is Essential and Here to Stay

BY Lisa Goldman | Tuesday, October 30 2012

Secretary Clinton, State Dept Flickr stream

A new paper from the Brookings Institute examines the reach and effectiveness of eDiplomacy. Read More