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Beyond @Congressedits, Capitol Hill Looks for Entry to Wikipedia

BY Miranda Neubauer | Thursday, July 31 2014

As he recently told techPresident, the creator of Congressedits did not aim to make Members of Congress look bad, but said he hoped that they would recognize the importance of Wikipedia as a public space and engage more with its community. "If staffers and politicians identified as Wikipedians, that would be super. You could imagine politicians' home pages with a list of their recent edits, that they would be proud of the things that they are doing." On Capitol Hill, there is in fact interest in making that vision a reality, starting off with an initial conversation that could create a framework for more Wikipedians in Congress. Read More

@Congressedits Hopes to See More Wikipedians in Congress

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, July 14 2014

In the future, could members of Congress list their Wikipedia edits on their homepage along with their voting records and constituent services? That is the vision of Congressedits, a Twitter feed that within only the past few days has helped popularize the idea of anonymously tracking government and instutional edits to Wikipedia pages around the world. Read More

Why Members of Congress Miss House Votes: An Online Diary

BY Miranda Neubauer | Tuesday, December 6 2011

A news web developer's side project highlights the daily cases where members of Congress engage in a different kind of flip-flop. A House rule allows members of Congress to announce how they would have voted, had they ... Read More

After Leaders' Calls for Public Support, House, Senate Flooded With Electronic Interest

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, July 26 2011

President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner were both warning the American public of catastrophe last night if the White House and the Republican leadership in Congress couldn't get together to reach a debt ... Read More

Google's Schmidt Does a GOP Pop-In

BY Nancy Scola | Monday, November 15 2010

Photo credit: Charles Haynes A recent dropper-by to the bat cave wherein House Republicans are planning their assumption of leadership? Read More

C-SPAN Calls on Boehner to Show How Congress Reacts

BY Nancy Scola | Monday, November 15 2010

Ah, another change of power on Congress, and another call by C-SPAN to let them finally film the goings-on of the legislature in the way that they'd film any other debate-type event -- by capturing not just the face of ... Read More

Tweeting for Leadership

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, November 5 2010

Speaker (for now) Nancy Pelosi seems to have chosen Twitter as the place to make known her plans for what's next. "Driven by the urgency of creating jobs & protecting #hcr, #wsr, Social Security & Medicare, ... Read More

"It's Not Make Believe"

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, October 15 2010

Fast Company's Austin Carr has a look inside House Republican Whip Eric Cantor's new media shop, with a spotlight on Cantor's director of new media Matt Lira. Read More

News Briefs

RSS Feed tuesday >

First POST: Company

The global "Snowden effect" is huge; how many consumer-facing online services fail the user privacy test; the Dems' 2016 digital to-do list; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Mood Slime

The Sony email leak reveals the MPAA's campaign against Google; how Uber is lobbying in local markets; mapping the #MillionsMarchNYC; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Cloudy

What the Internet is not; new analysis of public opinion on net neutrality; how cloud backup apparently foiled a police coverup; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Records

Is the future of citizen journalism vigilantism?; one tech mogul's vocal support for CIA torture; a cri de couer from the founder of the Pirate Bay; and much, much more. GO

Web Index Sees Impact of Net Neutrality, Surveillance and Copyright Laws

Denmark, Finland, Norway, the United Kingdom and Sweden have come out on top of the Web Index, a ranking of the Web Foundation measuring the economic, social and political benefit that countries gain from the web. The United States is at number six. For the authors of the report accompanying the index, the results reflect how inequality has an impact on access to the web. "Nordic policy-makers have been quick to adopt and promote the free Internet - and open access to information - as a 21st century public good," the report states. " Others, as this year's findings show, need to move fast to catch up." The report attributes the Scandinavian countries' advantage to the countries' broader efforts to invest in public goods and establish a welfare and acting against " excess concentrations of wealth and power." With the lower inequality in those countries than in others, "the skills, means and freedoms to benefit from new technologies are widespread, which helps to explain why Scandinavian countries score highly on the political, social and economic impact of the Web GO

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