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At 18F, The U.S. Looks to Fail Fast on Government IT Projects Instead of Failing Big

BY Alex Howard | Thursday, April 3 2014

The state of govt IT today: Long lines in Columbia, SC waiting to sign-up for HealthCare.gov

Can a new small office inside the General Services Administration start to revolutionize how the U.S. government does information technology? That's the premise behind 18F. Longtime open government observer Alex Howard offers this in-depth report. Read More

With Code.Nasa.Gov, Agency Steps Up Hunt for Its Open-Source Software Projects

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, January 17 2012

With a new initiative, NASA explores its open-source projects. Image: Artist's concept of KOI-961 star system. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Not everyone agrees that the Obama White House has done everything around open government that it said it would do. But earlier this month, NASA lengthened the list of things that federal agencies could do. In addition to releasing data, like those that are gleaned from the Kepler space observatory, NASA now has code.nasa.gov, a central repository intended to eventually link out to every last open-source project maintained by people within the U.S. space agency. Read More

White House Appoints Steven VanRoekel as New U.S. CIO

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, August 4 2011

Steve VanRoekel A former Microsoft executive and Federal Communications Commission managing director, Steven VanRoekel, will become the next U.S. chief information officer, the White House announced today. VanRoekel ... Read More

Quote of the Day: 'One Click Away'

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, August 2 2011

Consumer companies are one click away from extinction, so they have to innovate constantly. Yet in enterprise IT, which is far inferior to consumer IT, victory is considered winning that contract. Once companies win ... Read More

British MPs Take a Close Look at Government IT 'Oligopoly' of Major Vendors

BY Nick Judd | Friday, July 29 2011

Writing for The Guardian, Michael Cross digs in to a report on British government IT that finds the folks across the pond are over-reliant on large contractors for their IT needs: The central charge is that governments ... Read More

Vivek Kundra's Tips for Smarter Government

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, July 14 2011

At the Sunlight Foundation* blog, Daniel Schuman recaps ten principles for improving federal transparency that federal Chief Information Officer Vivek Kundra delivered during testimony before a House Committee on ... Read More

Do Lawmakers' Texts During Public Meetings Become Public Documents?

BY Nick Judd | Monday, June 27 2011

The New Hampshire Union Leader's Beth LaMontagne Hall reports on some navel-gazing in Manchester, N.H., over texting during public meetings: During the June 12 Board of School Committee meeting, [Mayor Ted] Gatsas ... Read More

The Googlization of Wyoming

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, June 23 2011

Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead announced yesterday that all 10,000 of his state employees are now on Google Apps for Government, a version of Google's cloud-based office platform tweaked to meet government standards: Not only ... Read More

An iPad or 50 Amid a Sea of BlackBerrys

BY Nancy Scola | Tuesday, May 31 2011

iPads, iPhones, and other non-Blackberry personal tech devices are gaining traction in official Washington, reports the Washington Post's Michael S. Rosenwald -- though your call on whether the fact that 50 iPads or ... Read More

Where Did You Put Barack Obama's Hologram?

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, April 15 2011

White House photo by Pete Souza At a Chicago fundraiser last night, President Obama had some harsh things to say about the state he found government technology in when he became president in remarks overheard and ... Read More

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New Media Sites in Iran Blur Lines Between Citizen Journo, Professional Journo, & Activist

In 2010, Newsweek declared Iran the “birthplace of citizen journalism.” Iranian bloggers were hailed by Westerners as “brave” for their coverage of the aftermath of the disputed 2009 election. A 40-second video of the death of Neda Agha-Soltan during an anti-government protest won a prestigious George Polk Award, the first anonymously-produced work to be so honored. And then came the 2013 study “Whither Blogestan,” which sought to explain Iran's shrinking blogosphere. Of nearly 25,000 highly active and connected blogs in 2008 and 2009, only 20 percent were still online in September 2013.

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