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Riding Disgust Over GSA Scandal, Bill That Would Bolster Tracking of Federal Spending Heads Towards House Floor

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Thursday, April 19 2012

Proposed legislation would alter how federal agencies report spending. Photo: Shutterstock

House Republicans are wasting no time in riding the momentum provided by the recent General Services Administration spending scandal to push for legislation designed to bring more transparency to the way government agencies spend money. The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform made H.R. 2146, the Digital Accountability & Transparency Act (DATA) available for public comment on its Madison platform online Wednesday in anticipation of a floor vote next week. Committee Chairman Darrell Issa's spokesman Ali Ahmad says that the chairman, who is the chief sponsor of the legislation, would take into account any comments left on Madison. A new coalition of private companies, chaired by Issa's former Oversight Committee counsel, Hudson Hollister, also launched this week to promote legislation related to technology and transparency. Read More

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