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First POST: First They Came For the Muslims

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, July 9 2014

The Intercept details NSA and FBI surveillance of Muslim-American civic leaders; Om Malik urges Google and Facebook to take their big data responsibilities more seriously; the New York Public Library attacks the digital divide; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Decay

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, May 21 2014

The USA Freedom Act surveillance reform bill is getting watered down; Data.gov's 5th anniversary is no cause for celebration; Iran cracks down on "Happy" YouTube video sharers; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Wheeler Dealer

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, April 24 2014

The FCC wants to allow "commercially reasonable" discrimination online; net neutrality advocates protest; Comcast Country (aka "Philadelphia") comes under scrutiny; and much, much more. Read More

Coming to Grips With Our Not-So-New Surveillance State

BY Matt Stoller | Tuesday, March 18 2014

An FBI agent collects the agency's one-hundred-millionth fingerprint (National Archives and Records Admin.)

In this op-ed, Matt Stoller looks at the history of surveillance in America and argues that the current conversation about the NSA's massive system of dragnet surveillance is missing perspective. We've been living in surveillance state for decades, he writes, one that has long merged commercial and state snooping into individuals' private lives. And we're not powerless to fight it. Read More

First POST: Openly Closed

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, March 17 2014

It's Sunshine Week, and the US government is less transparent, says AP; secret-sharing apps like Whisper and Secret are dangerous, says Austin Hill; and taking pictures of people in public now requires their permission, says Hungary; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Whiz Kids

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, February 27 2014

The inside story on how the HealthCare.gov site was saved; the limits of political moneyball; GCHQ captured millions of Yahoo webcam chat images; and much, much more. Read More

"Seeing Secrecy": Art as Evidence and Secrecy as Art

BY Jessica McKenzie | Tuesday, February 4 2014

Trevor Paglen speaking on the panel "Art as Evidence"

In the past eight months, secrets have become practically mundane.

Starting in June with The Guardian story that revealed the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) had ordered Verizon to hand over Americans' phone call metadata to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National Security Agency (NSA), the avalanche of exposed government secrets continued at a frantic pace through the summer and on into fall and winter. Only a week ago, articles published by The Guardian, The New York Times and ProPublica showed that the NSA and the British Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) collect data en masse from smartphone apps like Angry Birds and Google Maps. In a way, these leaks have become so predictable they border on pedestrian.

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First POST: "Who Watches?"

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, January 8 2014

The Obama administration won't release a legal memo giving the FBI warrantless spying powers; one of the 1971 burglars who exposed FBI domestic spying back then explains her actions; cops use social media to catch gangs; cops get caught on social media defrauding the taxpayer; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: "Somebody Had to Do It"

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, January 7 2014

A blast from the FBI's dirty tricks past sheds light on the NSA's present; internal disputes at WikiLeaks spill into the open; why the Internet is so unkind to women and what to do about it; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: The Big Chill

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, January 6 2014

The NSA won't deny snooping on Members of Congress; the full size of the Koch brothers conservative political network starts to come into view; the emerging pieces of Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign-in-waiting get mapped; and much, much more. Read More