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First POST: Civicus

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, December 4 2013

The nitty-gritty on Knight Foundation's new report on the state of civic tech investment; more from Pierre Omidyar and Jay Rosen on NewCo; waiting for heads to roll over HealthCare.gov; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: NewCo News

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, November 18 2013

Exclusively for Personal Democracy Plus subscribers: More details on Pierre Omidyar and Glenn Greenwald's still unnamed NewCo investigative journalism site; one bankrupt Rhode Island town is trying crowdfunding for its parks; and the best reading from last week's 'book surge' break that you might have missed. Read More

First POST: Drip, Drip

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, September 11 2013

Exclusively for Personal Democracy Plus subscribers: The NSA releases new documents showing it violates its own privacy rules on a daily basis; cryptoparties are springing up again in Germany; gun control supporters are recalled in Colorado; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Thousands

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, August 16 2013

Exclusively for Personal Democracy Plus subscribers: The implications of Barton Gellman's huge new NSA scoop; Wired shows how tired it is of women; Shark Week ends; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Not Clapping

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, August 14 2013

Exclusively for Personal Democracy Plus subscribers: How to protect your online communications; Bitcoin comes under federal scrutiny; Booker rises; Chicago wants to know if you're sick; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

After 3-Day Internet Shutdown, Syria's Regime is Now Targeting Activists with Powerful New Malware

BY Lisa Goldman | Thursday, December 6 2012

When the Syrian Internet system was cut off last week, observers feared the regime had cut the civilian population off for good so that the army could do its worst without having to worry about activists filming massacres and uploading the footage to YouTube. In fact the Internet was restored after three days. But now the regime is using powerful new malware to target activists. Read More

Canada Considering Legislation That Would Give Police Power to Monitor Internet Users Without a Warrant

BY Lisa Goldman | Monday, July 23 2012

In February of this year, Canada's ruling Conservative party introduced Bill C-30, legislation that would give police the right to demand subscriber data from ISPs without having to obtain a warrant. The bill languished for a few months, but now its many opponents fear it is about to be revived. Read More

As Controversial Cybersecurity Legislation Moves Through House, Activists Make a Quiet Start

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Wednesday, April 18 2012

Image: The growing Internet citizenry is using sarcasm, wit and Twitter to draw attention to a controversial cybersecurity bill

After Internet businesses and activists forced the halt of the Stop Online Piracy Act, it seemed as if a new political force had come alive to advocate on Capitol Hill for an Internet with hard limits on government surveillance and a structure that favored free access to information over centralized control. But faced with new cybersecurity legislation that civil liberties groups say would contribute to exactly the opposite, the headline-grabbing protests that defeated SOPA are nowhere to be seen. So what's happening? Read More

Activists Plan Protests Against House Internet Surveillance Bill "CISPA"

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Wednesday, April 11 2012

Image: Shutterstock/Arena Creative

Many of the same organizations that planned the Internet-wide protests that killed the Stop Online Piracy Act are gearing up to launch another high profile demonstration against a controversial piece of cybersecurity legislation that is speeding towards the House floor.

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Editorial: How @Google And Friends Can Build Local Internet Power

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, March 26 2012

Poster from Google's Take Action page against SOPA/PIPA

Just over two months ago, somewhere around 10 million people emailed, called, faxed and otherwise cajoled their Members of Congress to express their opposition to the Stop Online Privacy (SOPA) and Protect IP (PIPA) Acts. An approximated 115,000 websites either went "dark" or joined the campaign in related ways, with Google, Wikipedia, Firefox, Wordpress, and Tumblr all playing leading roles. In two days, legislation that had been moving through Congress like a dose of salts was withdrawn from consideration, with dozens of Members suddenly announcing their opposition, including many who had originally supported the bills. The Internet had won, at least this once. Micah Sifry asks, now what? He writes: "We urgently need a conversation about one other huge piece of the puzzle: What's going to happen with all those email addresses Google and the other anti-SOPA groups collected from people who responded to their call to action on January 18th?" Read More