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"Seeing Secrecy": Art as Evidence and Secrecy as Art

BY Jessica McKenzie | Tuesday, February 4 2014

Trevor Paglen speaking on the panel "Art as Evidence"

In the past eight months, secrets have become practically mundane.

Starting in June with The Guardian story that revealed the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) had ordered Verizon to hand over Americans' phone call metadata to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National Security Agency (NSA), the avalanche of exposed government secrets continued at a frantic pace through the summer and on into fall and winter. Only a week ago, articles published by The Guardian, The New York Times and ProPublica showed that the NSA and the British Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) collect data en masse from smartphone apps like Angry Birds and Google Maps. In a way, these leaks have become so predictable they border on pedestrian.

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First POST: Lip Reading

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, February 3 2014

Journalism after Snowden; Canada's unfolding spying scandal; PopVox's bright future; and much, much more. Read More

After Snowden, Columbia J-School Panel Sees Renewed Need for Legal Framework Protecting Journalists

BY Miranda Neubauer | Friday, January 31 2014

The editors of the Guardian's U.S. edition and the New York Times, a First Amendment lawyer and a member of the Obama-appointed surveillance review panel called for a renewed legal framework to protect the privacy and security interests of journalists in the wake of the unprecedented surveillance revelations from Edward Snowden at a panel at Columbia University Thursday night. Noting varying degrees of government pressure on both sides of the Atlantic, Guardian U.S. editor Janine Gibson and New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson stressed that respecting the right of news organizations to report on sensitive materials was in the government's interest as well, since otherwise the material would simply find its way out in a completely haphazard way without regard for any journalistic responsibility, which was also the outcome Edward Snowden hoped to avoid. Read More

First POST: Oh, Canada

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, January 31 2014

Canada's NSA exposed copying its Big Brother to the south; a former TSA screener tells all about those full-body scanners; Salesforce's Marc Benioff pushes back against Silicon Valley's libertarians; and much, much more. Read More

What Swartz, Lessig, Assange & Snowden Have to Teach Us

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, January 27 2014

Is the lone hacker-whistleblower model of change working? (flickr: Meet the Media Guru/biatch0r/Robert Douglass/Doc Searls)

The following is the text of the remarks I made yesterday at "As Darkness Falls," an international conference that took place this past weekend in Berlin, which was focused on "Theory and Practice of Self-Empowerment in the Age of Digital Control." (People here are taking the NSA surveillance revelations very seriously.) One of my co-panelists was Jacob Applebaum, an independent hacker and security expert who works on Tor, whom I refer to as Jake at one point in my comments. Video of our full panel should be posted online soon. Read More

First POST: Bitcoin Agonistes

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, January 22 2014

Is Bitcoin going to change the world? One of the inventors of the web browser thinks so; Edward Snowden denies being a Russian puppet; the Ukrainian government geolocates protesters and sends them a scary SMS; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Paranoid Liberalism

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, January 21 2014

The New Republic accuses Snowden, Greenwald and Assange of being "paranoid libertarians"; Academics think Facebook can be used to predict election results; Data-mining for marketing purposes goes really, really awry; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Leeway

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, January 20 2014

President Obama unburdens himself to David Remnick of The New Yorker; Rep. Mike Rogers says Edward Snowden may be a Russian tool; Jody Avirgan catalogues all the crazy things the NSA is doing; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Welcome to the NBA

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, January 16 2014

Reading the tea-leaves before President Obama's NSA reform speech Friday; Fred Wilson explains why the end of net neutrality spells bad news for tech start-ups; SayIt, a new tool for annotating public transcripts, launches; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Battle Lines

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, January 15 2014

Previewing President Obama's Friday speech on NSA reform; dealing with the defeat of the FCC's "open internet" rule"; tracking the winners of the Knight News Challenge health round and the New Media Ventures innovation fund; and much, much more. Read More