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WeGov

Burson-Marsteller Releases Annual Twiplomacy Study

BY Jessica McKenzie | Wednesday, June 25 2014

"What you tweet is what you get." Finnish PM @AlexStubb

The Spanish King's abdication, Narendra Modi's win, the loss of Malaysia airlines and an Olympic bet were just a few topics of the most popular tweets by world leaders this year. Each garnered more than 24,000 retweets, according to the 2014 Burson-Marsteller's Twiplomacy Study, which captures an annual snapshot of the power, influence and relationships of world leaders and diplomats on Twitter.

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WeGov

Electronic “Asylum” for the Internetless

BY Rebecca Chao | Monday, July 8 2013

(image: Freedom House/flickr)

While there is no on-off switch for the Internet in Syria, it only takes a few phone calls to turn it off. In the U.S. we can choose from thousands of Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to get connected but in Syria, where the government allegedly shut down connectivity several times in recent months, there are only around 14, which are also government-controlled. Read More

WeGov

Examining eDiplomacy: Like it or Not, It is Essential and Here to Stay

BY Lisa Goldman | Tuesday, October 30 2012

Secretary Clinton, State Dept Flickr stream

A new paper from the Brookings Institute examines the reach and effectiveness of eDiplomacy. Read More

WeGov

The Rough and Tumble of Digital Diplomacy, For Better or Worse

BY Lisa Goldman | Thursday, October 25 2012

Screenshot from the the State Department's blog

Digital diplomacy is a bit of a buzzword these days. It is practiced widely, both formally and informally, by governments across the globe — the United Kingdom has a particularly extensive site. Brian Fung of the Atlantic explores the impact of direct engagement via social media in an article for the Atlantic: Digital Diplomacy: Why It's So Tough for Embassies to Get Social Media Right. Read More

WeGov

Shot by Taliban, Pakistani Teen Activist Malala Continues To Be Target of Online Threats and Conspiracy Theories

BY Nighat Dad | Tuesday, October 16 2012

Photo of Malala by the writer.

Malala Yousafzai, a 14 year-old Pakistani girl, was shot in the head last week by Taliban. Her crime was spreading western values — i.e., insisting on the right of girls to attend school. Malala had been the target of online threats for several years; and now, even as she lies unconscious in a U.K. hospital, the Taliban continues to threaten her life if she recovers, while prominent nationalists tweet conspiracy theories accusing the CIA of being involved in the shooting. For Malala, the Internet has been a mixed blessing. Read More

PdFLeaks: Carne Ross on the Diplomacy Before and After Wikileaks

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, December 15 2010

I didn't have a lot of time to digest what was being said while I was running the first session of Saturday's PdF Symposium on Wikileaks and Internet Freedom, but as I look back, the points that stuck with me the most ... Read More

What Does " Civil Society" Mean in 2010? 2050?

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, November 5 2010

Gathered today at the World Bank in DC are people interested in figuring out what "civil society" -- that swath of human life that exists apart from, or at least complementary to, what governments do and what ... Read More

State Dept's Latest "Tech Del" Heads to Bogotá

BY Nancy Scola | Tuesday, July 13 2010

The State Department's latest "tech del" trip is a 3-day mission to Bogotá, Colombia. Read More

George Bush Throws a Cyber-Dissidence Conference

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, April 9 2010

Hillary Clinton and George W. Bush are two peas in a cyber-dissident pod, it seems: Read More