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First POST: Info-Kale

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, February 2 2015

How the net neutrality movement went from "stop" to "go"; Facebook's ongoing effort to make News Feed more nutritious; inside Vladimir Putin's social media army; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Font of Wisdom

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, March 28 2014

Charting the various NSA reform proposals; mapping the Twitter/YouTube/Facebook bans; exiting from Facebook?; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Launch Codes

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, March 4 2014

The latest on the Crimea crisis; Sen. Al Franken casts doubt on the Comcast-Time Warner merger; Vice, Brookings and GovLab all have new launches; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Post-Ambition and Fear Not

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, February 25 2014

Cyberwar in Syria?; the Obama 2012 tech tools are being shared with lower ballot candidates; the debate over Netflix and Comcast continues; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

In Syria, All's Fair in Love, Tech and Civil War

BY Jessica McKenzie | Friday, February 14 2014

There is more than a bit of Pygmalion in Haidar's story (Marissa-rissa)

They say all's fair in love and war, and this story contains a bit of each. Yesterday The Guardian profiled Ahmad Haidar, a hacker and technologist who uses his skills to battle the Syrian government. After the Syrian Electronic Army offered him a position in the group in 2011, he bailed on them in favor of the rebels. He used to make viruses to infect state-controlled websites, and he named them after—who else—ex-girlfriends. Haidar's newest project is a robot that can rescue sniper victims without putting more lives in danger. He has named it Tena, after a Finnish woman he once sat next to on an airplane.

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WeGov

Google Ideas Map Shows What Cyber Warfare Looks Like Today

BY Jessica McKenzie | Monday, October 21 2013

DDoS attacks on October 21, 2013

A swirling vortex hovers over Washington D.C. and brightly colored dots pour into the city from above. Elsewhere—in China, France and Brazil, for example—less impressive streams penetrate their capital cities as well. What looks at first glance like an image from the classic alien attack film Independence Day is actually a new visualization from Google Ideas and Arbor Networks. Called the Digital Attack Map, it depicts Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks around the world and will be updated with new data on a daily basis. The map was launched today as part of the Google Ideas' “Conflict in a Connected World” summit.

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