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First POST: Messaging

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, April 30 2014

How Americans are(n't) responding to the dangers of the Heartbleed bug; mobile politicking's unconquered territory; how some of Silicon Valley is embracing the "nerd prom"; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Bleeding Hearts

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, April 14 2014

Did the NSA exploit the Heartbleed bug instead of fixing it?; one in five Americans online has had their private accounts hacked; UltraViolet gets under Dartmouth's skin with online ads; and much, much more. Read More

What We Really (Should) Talk About When We Talk About Big Data

BY Jessica McKenzie | Friday, March 7 2014

Corporations don't need census data to guess your race & use it against you (Wikipedia)

Discrimination. Redlining. Racial profiling. These practices predate the Internet, and yet there is every indication that technology can enable infringements on civil rights to an even greater extent than before. Last week, in an effort to put civil rights at the forefront of the ongoing debate about digital privacy and security, a coalition of civil and human rights organizations jointly released “Civil Rights Principles for the Era of Big Data,” five tenets to guide policy-making.

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The Day After The Day We Fought Back: Another Anti-Surveillance Campaign Already in the Works

BY Jessica McKenzie | Wednesday, February 12 2014

Reset button (Greg McMullin/Flickr)

Yesterday was the day the Internet fought back against mass surveillance. According to The Day We Fight Back website, roughly 86,815 calls were made to legislators and 179,682 emails were sent. The question is—what to do now? Luckily, the nonprofit organization Fight for the Future already has something in mind. They are in the process of recruiting participants and building support for the campaign Reset the Net, which will likely take place this spring.

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WeGov

Africa Needs A Cybersecurity Law But AU's Proposal is Flawed, Advocates Say

BY Joel Macharia | Friday, January 31 2014

The AU may soon pass a cybersecurity bill that advocates say will not offer enough protections (EmbassyEquatorialGuinea/flickr)

Over the past 12 years, Africa has experienced a boom in telecommunication use; in fact, between 2000 and 2012, compared to any other region, Africa had the fastest rate of Internet penetration at 3,606.7% over that period. Kenya has the world’s largest mobile money transfer service, MPESA. Evidently, the increasing growth in Internet and mobile use has created a need for legislation that helps deter crime, and that enhances confidence and security in African cyberspace leading to the drafting of the Africa Union Convention on Cybersecurity (AUCC). The convention, however, has met with some resistance from tech and civil society, who claim it does not do enough to protect privacy and freedom of speech. Read More

WeGov

"Prism On Steroids" At The Russian Olympics

BY Jessica McKenzie | Tuesday, January 28 2014

Beefing up surveillance (Jedimentat44/Flickr)

New Internet legislation in Russia is scheduled to go into effect on February 1, just one week before the XXII Winter Olympics Games begin in Sochi. Less than a year after Russia outlawed “homosexual propaganda” online (or off), it has now set its sights on the use of social media platforms to organize protests. Starting in February, Internet providers can be ordered to block sites if someone tries to organize “participation in mass public events.”

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[BackChannel] Few Consequences When Cybersecurity Contractors Go Bad

BY Josh Glasstetter | Thursday, June 27 2013

In this piece for techPresident's Backchannel series, an ongoing conversation about technology and politics, blogger and researcher Josh Glasstetter describes the vastly different consequences for Edward Snowden compared to the cybersecurity contractors allegedly involved in a scheme to discredit the opponents of private clients. Read More

New Microsite from Fight for the Future Raises Alarm Over Cybersecurity Legislation

BY Miranda Neubauer | Wednesday, August 1 2012

Fight for the Future has launched a new campaign related to the Senate's Cybersecurity Act of 2012, suggesting that passage of the bill could end up allowing online services to hand over user data to the government, let the government spy on searches, e-mails, chats, photos, social behavior and real-time location and use it as evidence against users. For Fight For the Future, this campaign grows to a large degree out of concern over measures in the House bill, CISPA, which was passed in April and strongly criticized by privacy advocates. Read More

One Way or Another, Campaigns Learn About Online Security and the Dangers of the Internet

BY Christian Bourge | Thursday, June 28 2012

Campaigns are learning the dangers of the Internet. Photo: Tactical Technology Collective

When Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s campaign announced earlier this month it was investigating a possible intrusion into the candidate's personal email account, it called into question how American political campaigns secure their data, electronic communications, and online operations. Read More

One of the People Who Challenges The Internet Powers-That-Be

BY Nick Judd | Wednesday, November 23 2011

Go read this profile of Chris Soghoian, a security researcher with a knack for navigating the paper trail, whose constant badgering of the new Internet powers-that-be have been changing policies in boardrooms and on ... Read More