Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

Unity '08: Using the Net to Build a Centrist Movement?

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, May 31 2006

I try to not use this blog to talk about partisan politics, and I encourage the other PDF contributing editors to do the same. So, while the "Unity '08" announcement by a group of bipartisan political consultants and ex-politicians (including one member of PDF's advisory board, Nicco Mele) that they are going to use the internet to foster the development of a 20 million member voting bloc behind unity ticket in 2008 cries out for commentary, it inevitably also invites one to inject all sorts of political judgments about the purpose and value of third-party political campaigns in presidential elections.

So, since I have a personal blog for my own more political and personal musings....and I have written a whole book on third parties in American politics, I've posted my initial thoughts on Unity '08 there.

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: Scotched

Why conservatives should back net neutrality; how big data may damage civil rights; the ways Silicon Valley start-ups are exploiting freelance workers; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Resets

Apple's new iOS8 promises greater user privacy; Occupy Wall Street three years later; how tech may tilt the Scotland independence vote; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Connecting the Dots

Take Back the Tech grades Facebook, Twitter, et al, on transparency; MayDay PAC founder Lawrence Lessig talks about getting matched funds; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Splits

USA Freedom Act divides Internet activists; Julian Assange's Reddit "Ask Me Anything"; New York's pro-net-neutrality protest; and much, much more GO

monday >

After Election Loss, Teachout and Wu Keep Up Net Neutrality and Anti-Comcast Merger Campaign

The Teachout/Wu campaign may have lost, but their pro net-neutrality campaign continued Monday as both former candidates participated in a rallly in New York City marking the final day to comment on the Federal Communications Commission's Internet proposals and kept up their pressure on Governor Andrew Cuomo. GO

More